May 2011

Researchers study return on short-term missions

May 4 2011 by Terry Goodrich, Associated Baptist Press

WACO, Texas — Research has revealed students who participate in short-term mission trips tend to have lower levels of materialism, greater appreciation for other cultures and a better understanding of missions as a lifestyle, says a Baylor University professor studying whether short-term mission trips are good stewardship.

The number of United States Christians taking part in trips lasting a year or less has grown from 540 in 1965 to more than 1.5 million annually, with an estimated $2 billion per year spent on the effort. That investment of time and money has sparked debate whether the money might better be spent giving directly to a country’s Christian partners for spreading the gospel and offering medical aid, construction assistance or other help. Some long-term missionaries complain that culturally insensitive short-term mission participants do more harm than good by damaging relationships that had taken years to build.

Dennis Horton, associate professor of religion at Baylor says the answer to whether volunteers missions "is worth it" is a qualified “yes.”

Two-thirds of short-term trips last two weeks or less, with a host of purposes ranging from evangelism to digging wells or teaching English-as-a-Second-Language classes. On the surface, Horton said, the trips seem a win-win-win situation — for those who send participants, for team members who make the trips and for host countries.

“It is very much worthwhile. But I’m qualifying that by saying I think a lot of churches and groups need more follow-up to help mission team members incorporate what they’ve learned on their trips into their daily lives,” Horton said. “Long-term involvement, whether global or local, is where you see transformation taking place.”

About 600 students and 48 short-term mission trip leaders participated in the study conducted by Horton and four Baylor University undergraduate research assistants—Claire Aufhammer, Matt Berry from Idalou,; Daniel Camp and Amy Rozzi.

For long-term effects on those who go on short-term mission trips, some studies show little difference between those who have participated short-term trips and Christians who have not, Horton said. Patterns are similar in terms of giving, materialism and believing one’s culture is superior to others.

What makes a difference, according to virtually all studies, is pre-trip training, on-site mentoring and follow-up after the trip, he explained.

“We appreciate the zeal” of students, he said. “They want to be on the streets evangelizing. They say, ‘We need to get out there and share the gospel.’ But the missionaries are saying ‘Wait a minute.’ In many countries, the most effective way to reach others is through friendships built over time rather than quick presentations of the gospel that can endanger the work — and lives — of long-term missionaries and local Christians.

“The study shows that many short-term mission trip leaders are doing a much better job training their team members about cultural issues and connecting with host countries. They’re doing a lot of things right and learning from past mistakes.”

Recent guidebooks are aimed at helping trip leaders aid team members move from mission trips to a lifestyle of missions, Horton said.

“The desire is to ensure that short-term mission experiences become more than spiritual tourism in which participants travel to an exotic place, take a myriad of photos and return to their relatively isolated home environments, as well as their pre-trip behavior and routines,” he said.

But researchers found post-trip follow-up by team leaders, usually from churches, schools or mission agencies, falls short.

Because students may be scattered after the trips, it can be difficult to do much follow-up other than online or through periodic reunions, Horton said. Churches, campus ministries and Christian colleges that offer coursework can play a huge role.

In their study, Horton and his research assistants surveyed students with different amounts of short-term missions experience (and some without any) about their levels of materialism, ethnocentrism and their interest in long-term involvement in missions or ministry. For some, the trips reinforced a calling to vocational missions.

For those who were ambivalent, the trips clarified how or whether they would be involved in vocational mission work.

Many people make a commitment at Christian youth camps to become missionaries, Horton said, but “some find out a little bit more and say: ‘Oh, that isn’t for me. I can do this for a few weeks, but I like my technology, my comforts.’ It wasn’t that they didn’t still have an interest or wanted to work with local missions. But as far as vocational missions, they need to have a definite call and realize this is how God can best use them.”

Some opt against career mission work when they see its challenges.

“In some countries, there are immediate responses to the gospel, with hundreds of people becoming Christians, but in other countries, you could work for years and have only one or two convert to Christianity,” Horton said. “Students hoping to see instant results on a two-week trip may become discouraged in these areas where people need more time before responding in a positive way to the gospel.”

(EDITOR’S NOTE — Goodrich writes for Baylor University.)

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)  
5/4/2011 12:51:00 PM by Terry Goodrich, Associated Baptist Press | with 0 comments



In battered Tuscaloosa, churches share the pain

May 3 2011 by Joni B. Hannigan, Baptist Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Trudging through the streets of Tuscaloosa following the April 27 killer tornado, Billy Gray, interim director of missions for the Tuscaloosa County Baptist Association, expressed shock at the overwhelming destruction that made thousands homeless, caused a massive power outage and left at least 38 people confirmed dead.

With estimated wind speeds of up to 200 mph, the EF4 tornado that left a mile-wide debris field hit densely populated neighborhoods of Tuscaloosa, snaking around the University of Alabama, the DCH Regional Medical Center and a high school.

Entire communities were leveled, and at least half a dozen of the association’s 80-plus churches were heavily damaged.

People walked behind the police barricades, looking at the piles of timber that used to be the walls of someone’s living room. They stared at trees flashing their undersides, flipping up asphalt. They watched as workers stacked huge power poles and waited for more to arrive. They walked in the blazing hot sun and accepted a cool bottle of water. Their eyes lit up momentarily.

“We talked to some of these people. They are OK. They seem to be OK,” Gray said. “They can laugh, but I know they are hurting.”

In Crescent Ridge, an area turned nearly to mulch by the twister, Gray said he spoke with a recently widowed woman who lives close to all of her family. And all of their homes had just been destroyed.

“They are OK as far as handling things, but in looking at the devastation, the lady said, ‘Every once in a while I just have to cry, but I don’t make a practice of it,’” Gray said. “I think that’s a good way to put it.”

Gray said he was looking forward to the arrival of Alabama Baptist disaster relief chaplains who are trained in counseling those who are faced with loss and grief. He was grateful for the volunteer team already serving alongside the American Red Cross.

“I am extremely proud of our people,” Gray said. “I have been bombarded with calls from people wanting to help. It’s a wonderful thing to see.”

On the scene since April 28, J.D. Beck, disaster relief team leader for the Tuscaloosa association’s disaster relief unit, was overseeing feeding efforts at a shelter operated by the Red Cross at Beck Park.

At the 24-hour shelter where an estimated 600 people have been staying since before the storm, Beck said the 13 Alabama volunteers were joined by two from the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention who were visiting when the storm hit. The two had their gear packed and were ready, so they joined in.

One of the smallest units in the state, Beck said his volunteers nonetheless are equipped to feed up to 2,000 people at each meal. At the Tuscaloosa site, the volunteers were working alongside Red Cross workers to feed the 600 at the shelter and to supply an additional 250 meals to about six vehicles used by the Red Cross to distribute the food.

Beck, who has been involved in disaster relief work since 1994, said he believes in caring for people, even if sometimes it’s behind-the-scenes work.

Standing tall beside a disaster relief trailer that holds cleaning supplies and cooking equipment, Beck stopped for a moment to work out some details with a Red Cross official about propane gas procurement.

Photo by Joni B. Hannigan

Tuscaloosa residents gather their salvageable belongings and carry them in a grocery cart that doubles as a stroller.


What Jesus said about the cup of water is what keeps Beck willing to volunteer his time and effort.

“If you’ve done it unto the least of these, you’ve done it to me,” he said, quoting Jesus.

Tuscaloosa churches damaged
At Hopewell Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa, the tornado flipped a few shingles from the roof but otherwise bypassed the imposing brick buildings and instead tore into the neighborhood.

“Hot food and water” was advertised on a sign out front. Out back, some men from the church were grilling hot dogs and hamburgers to give to those who dropped by. Sandy Guy, director of women on mission, said the congregation is praying for those who are suffering. “We are truly blessed and thankful,” Guy said, noting that in the past three weeks three storms had gone “around” the church.

Only 16 blocks away, at Alberta Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa, winds blew the steeple, roof and the front wall onto the steps, leaving mounds of insulation and splintered wood hanging from a huge opening in the ceiling of the church’s newly renovated sanctuary. The educational space also was heavily damaged.

Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa suffered extensive damage, Gray said, and he was unsure whether the congregation would be able to continue to meet in its facility.

Left standing in an otherwise nearly flattened older neighborhood, Forest Lake Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa was being assessed for structural damage likely to have occurred when the church was lifted off its foundation, Gray said. The building was being used to store teacher supplies from the nearby elementary school that was destroyed. After members and volunteers shuttered broken windows and made other repairs, the church became a community center for food and supplies.

“We are trying to get more resources out to them,” Gray said of Forest Lake Baptist. The sanctuary at Rosedale Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa has “quite a bit of damage,” Gray said, but the congregation may be able to meet in the fellowship hall for services. “That neighborhood is gone,” he said. “It is devastated.”

New Eastern Hills Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa sustained heavy damage with a large hole in the wall, roof damage and windows being blown out. They will meet elsewhere for a while, Gray said.

A few families from Temple Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa lost their homes, Gray said, but the church received only mild damage. At rural Fleetwood Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa, where some of the surrounding neighborhood was wiped out, Gray said one member was killed and 14 members lost their homes.

Gary Bonner, associate director of missions for the Tuscaloosa association, said he was happy churches are working together during the crisis and reaching into their communities. The need is extensive, he said, and the disaster relief effort needs to be ongoing.

“Not for a week or two weeks, and not even a month,” Bonner said. “We’ve never had a tornado of this velocity come right through the center of town. There is more loss of life than in the history of Tuscaloosa County.

“It’s going to take a long time. We really need to do everything we can to work together and be patient,” Bonner said. “We are (going to) do everything we can in the short term but be prepared to serve in the long term.”

Gray agreed. He said there is hope even for the people of Tuscaloosa.

“I would say to these people that God is with us through the bad times as well as the good,” Gray said. “I think everybody — as bad as it is — we are going to make it though, and we are (going to) come back.”

Relying on God, having a good attitude and supplying people with resources will help in the long haul, Gray said.

“This has a way of rearranging your priorities,” Gray said, but people can look at it and say, ‘OK, it’s bad, but we are (going to) make it.’”

(EDITOR’S NOTE — Hannigan is managing editor of the Florida Baptist Witness newspaper and wrote this article as a special correspondent for The Alabama Baptist. View an e-edition of The Alabama Baptist with extensive tornado coverage at online.thealabamabaptist.org. Donations to disaster relief can be made to state conventions, or directly to the North American Mission Board’s disaster relief fund, at NAMB.net, or by calling 1-866-407-NAMB (6262). A $10 donation can be made by texting “NAMBDR” to the number “40579.”)  

Related stories
In battered Tuscaloosa, churches share the pain
Ala. churches serve as resource centers
Guest column: Here’s how you can help Alabama

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
5/3/2011 4:41:00 AM by Joni B. Hannigan, Baptist Press | with 0 comments



Ala. churches serve as resource centers

May 3 2011 by Jennifer Davis Rash, Baptist Press

PHIL CAMPBELL, Ala. — Annihilation seemed to loom as three deadly tornadoes ripped through the small adjoining towns of Phil Campbell and Hackleburg, Ala., killing more than 50 people. The storms came about as close to total destruction as anyone there ever wants to be.

“Fifty percent of our population is displaced,” Tim Haney, pastor of First Baptist Church in Phil Campbell, said of the nearly 1,100 people in the town.

“We have no power, no water and some people lost everything,” he said, noting the death toll continued to rise and several people were still missing. Both towns literally were flattened in parts by the storms April 27.

It was as if a giant weed eater cleared a path nearly a mile wide in Phil Campbell and more than three miles wide in Hackleburg, Haney said. Steve Lawrence, pastor of First Baptist Church in Hackleburg, said, “There is hardly anything left in those three miles. The school is leveled. The stores, the Wrangler plant and all the houses are gone.”

While some areas were wiped clean as if nothing ever sat there, other areas contain the splintered remnants of homes, vehicles and businesses.

With all telephone lines down, communication became a serious issue. The towns seemed cut off from the outside world. News of loved ones flowed through the communities by word of mouth and sometimes took days to make it to the people fretting the most.

Still, in both towns, it was the church that became the central point of communication and the place people gathered throughout the days following the destruction.

First Baptist Phil Campbell suffered only minor structural damage to its main building and likely will have to rebuild its multipurpose building, but Mountain View Baptist Church in the same town didn’t fare as well.

“The church is gone, Bro. Sammy. The church is gone.”

Those were the first words Sammy Taylor, pastor of Mountain View Baptist, heard just seconds after emerging from a storm shelter within sight of the church.

Photo by Jennifer Davis Rash

Amy Rollins, a member of First Baptist Church in Phil Campbell, Ala., organizes food items at the church. Food and clothing are being given to tornado survivors as the church has become a resource center for the community.


“The building is a total loss,” Taylor told The Alabama Baptist (see the newspaper’s e-edition at online.thealabamabaptist.org). “But the church is not the building. The church is the people. We’ll get through this.”

The Mountain View Baptist family lost two church members in the storms, an adult woman and a 9-year-old boy. First Baptist Phil Campbell lost two adult women.

No deaths were reported from the First Baptist Hackleburg membership, and information from Emmanuel Baptist Church in Hackleburg was not available.

While First Baptist Hackleburg received only minor damage, Emmanuel Baptist was destroyed. The church’s pastor, Gene Thomas, was hospitalized.

Lawrence said his city was in the same shape as Phil Campbell.

“At least 50 percent, if not more, of our people are displaced,” he said of the more than 1,200 people in the town. So he’s doing the only thing he knows to do — help.

He has organized First Baptist Hackleburg as a resource site for the community as well as a drop-off and distribution center for clothing and nonperishable items. Meals are being served in the church’s multipurpose center.

First Baptist Phil Campbell has a similar setup.

Amy Rollins, a member of First Baptist Phil Campbell, was the first to arrive at the church after the storms rolled through the area. She joined the group already there taking shelter from the storms and got to work.

“I started setting up for donations for people in need right away,” said Rollins, whose 6-year-old son Grant worked alongside her. “We don’t really know what to do, but it makes you feel better to help.”

In both towns, donations and assistance are pouring in from individuals, churches and businesses across the state. But water, food and clothes are not all those in need will receive. Haney plans to put a New Testament in their hands as well.

“We are planning to meet their physical needs and their spiritual needs,” he said, noting the Sunday service would take place as normal.

“We are out advertising we will be here Sunday,” Haney said April 29, noting an average Sunday attendance is 110–120.

“You might have a few more this Sunday,” a town resident picking up supplies from the church whispered in Haney’s ear as he walked by.

“Amen, brother,” Haney said. “I’ve been waiting for you to join us.”

At Mountain View Baptist, the May 1 service was scheduled to take place outside next to the demolished sanctuary as a time to “be together, pray together and love on each other,” Taylor said.

The sadness, shock and numbness among residents in Phil Campbell and Hackleburg stilled the air for any who witnessed the surreal atmosphere surrounding the two towns.

“We are shell shocked,” Rollins said. The dazed, robotic movements of those sifting through piles and piles of debris proved her point.

Taylor said the reality of what has happened has not truly sunk in yet. His wife Judy said, “I cry a lot.”

She’s not alone. Few people could speak of the horrific event days later without wiping away tears.

The smell of blood in the air still haunts Haney, and the heaviness of all that has happened and all that is to come shows in the weariness of the pastors’ faces.

“This is so massive,” Haney said. “In the matter of four minutes life as we know it changed.”

(EDITOR’S NOTE — Rash is managing editor of The Alabama Baptist. Donations to disaster relief can be made to state conventions, or directly to the North American Mission Board’s disaster relief fund, at NAMB.net, or by calling 1-866-407-NAMB (6262). A $10 donation can be made by texting “NAMBDR” to the number “40579.”)  

Related stories
In battered Tuscaloosa, churches share the pain
Ala. churches serve as resource centers
Guest column: Here’s how you can help Alabama

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
5/3/2011 4:32:00 AM by Jennifer Davis Rash, Baptist Press | with 0 comments



Stam, music prof, dies after cancer battle

May 3 2011 by Baptist Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Southern Baptist Theological Seminary’s Carl “Chip” L. Stam, professor of church music and worship and the founding director of the seminary’s Institute for Christian Worship, died May 1 after a four-year battle with an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma He was 58.

“Chip Stam was such a great gift to Southern Seminary and to the church of the Lord Jesus Christ,” said Southern Seminary President R. Albert Mohler Jr. “He was a gifted musician, as indicated by all of his musical accomplishments. But Chip Stam was so much more. He was a warm and faithful friend, an energetic faculty member and a wonderful worship leader.

To know Chip Stam was to know a warm-hearted artist with a deep commitment to Christ. Said Randy Stinson, dean of Southern Seminary’s School of Church Ministries, “Chip Stam was a gospel witness from beginning to end. He taught us how to live and maybe more importantly, he taught us how to die. His impact on students at SBTS will reach generations with the gospel as we worship the Lord Jesus in spirit and in truth. He will be greatly missed.”

During his time at the seminary, Stam also conducted the seminary’s oratorio chorus. Stam also conducted the Kentucky Baptist Men’s Chorale for more than 10 years. Beginning 2002, he served Louisville’s Clifton Baptist Church as the minister of music and worship.

Before coming to Southern Seminary, Stam was pastor of worship and music at the Chapel Hill Bible Church in Chapel Hill, N.C., from 1991-2000, where he also conducted the Chapel Hill Carrboro Community Chorus and directed music for The Raspberry Ridge: The Chapel Hill String Camp. From 1981-91, he was the director of choral music at the University of Notre Dame.

Stam, who earned both the bachelor of arts and master of music degrees at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and pursued additional studies at several institutions, also served as the national chair for American Choral Directors Association’s Repertoire and Standards Committee for Music and Worship. He conducted several all-state choirs and festival choruses, and served on the advisory councils for Reformed Worship magazine and the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship.

Beginning in 1995, Stam published a popular, Internet-based weekly devotional — Worship Quote of the Week — that shared interesting and challenging quotes about the nature of worship and prayer in the life of the Christian church.

“Chip mentored countless pastors and musicians from a distance through his Worship Quote of the Week, which has been an indispensable resource from my earliest days in ministry to the present,” said Lange Patrick, music and worship pastor at Louisville’s Highview Baptist Church. “Chip Stam not only knew God and loved to praise Him, but his passion for Christ was equally matched by the integrity of his life. When I think of Chip Stam, I think about Christ and am spurred on to make that my own legacy.”

A lifelong athlete, Stam played amateur tennis with the United States Tennis Association. He even earned a second-place ranking as a tennis player in the state of North Carolina as a high schooler.

Stam is survived by his wife of 35 years, Doris, and their three children: Michael, Martin and Clara. He is also survived by his mother, Jane Stam Miner, and siblings Karen, Paul and Billy.

“Chip inspired us all through his life, but he taught us even more about trust in Christ in the course of his illness and in the grace and trust in Christ he revealed until his death,” Mohler said of Stam’s battle with cancer. “Chip Stam will be sorely missed, and we grieve with his faithful wife, Doris, and his entire family. I am so thankful for all the lives touched by Chip Stam through his teaching at Southern Seminary and far beyond. His teaching legacy is in those students, and in the worship they lead.”

Visitation will be at Pearson’s Funeral Home on Breckenridge Lane in Louisville Friday, May 6. A private graveside service for the Stam family will be Saturday morning at Cave Hill Cemetery. Southern Seminary will host a public memorial service in the seminary’s Alumni Chapel Saturday, May 7, at 2 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial donations be made to Clifton Baptist Church in Louisville and Southern Seminary.

(EDITOR’S NOTE — Compiled by staff of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.)

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
5/3/2011 4:24:00 AM by Baptist Press | with 0 comments



After son’s death, parents continue ministry

May 3 2011 by Alan James, Baptist Press

RICHMOND, Va. — David Johnson occasionally wonders, if he had it to do all over again, whether he would have allowed his 21-year-old son Jeremiah to go to Mozambique to share the gospel among the Moniga people.

“I always said my whole pastoral life and parenting life the one thing I don’t think I could ever handle is losing a child,” said Johnson, director of Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary’s Arizona campus.

That fear became a reality for Johnson and his wife Diana on April 12, 2010, when the student missionary lost his life in a motorcycle accident on the mission field in Mozambique. The Johnsons continue to struggle through the pain of losing their son. One thing, though, gives them peace.

“Our son could have died any number of ways,” Johnson said. “But knowing what he was doing ... has made things completely different for us.

“Jeremiah was serving the Lord, following Christ and spreading the Word in Africa.”

Jeremiah Johnson poses with a group of children along the coast of Mozambique. Johnson, 21, died in an April 2010 motorcycle accident while serving as a Hands On missionary with the International Mission Board. His family and local church, Royal Palms Baptist Church in Phoenix, have since continued ministry among the Moniga people.


Last June, the Johnsons traveled to Mozambique to retrace their son’s steps and meet the people with whom Jeremiah had built relationships. There, Johnson baptized 17 men and women whom his son helped lead to Christ during Jeremiah’s short time in the country.

“I’ve baptized people in the Jordan River in Israel,” Johnson said. “In fact, I baptized my mother in the Jordan River, and it was not anything compared to (the baptism service in Mozambique).

“What God was doing in (Jeremiah) and through him was just amazing, nothing short of amazing,” Johnson added. Thinking through whether he would have allowed his son to still go there, if he had it to do over again, he said, “I would not hold Jeremiah back.”

Jeremiah, a member of Royal Palms Baptist Church in Phoenix and student at Glendale (Ariz.) Community College, was serving on the mission field with the International Mission Board’s semester-long Hands On initiative.

But it wasn’t Jeremiah’s first time in Africa among the Moniga people.

He had ministered among the Moniga with a Royal Palms team in the summer of 2009 as part of the church’s ongoing partnership among the people group.

Johnson was skeptical when Jeremiah first told him he wanted to go on the mission trip.

“When he signed up to go to Africa, he wasn’t really walking with the Lord,” Johnson said. “I said, ‘Son, shouldn’t you think about whether this is something God wants you to do?’”

Jeremiah responded, “Dad, I just want to go see Africa.”

“It wasn’t a really spiritual desire in the beginning,” Johnson added with a chuckle.

“I began to pray that God would do a work in Jeremiah’s life that would make God so real to him that he would never again question following the Lord.”

When Jeremiah returned from that first trip, Johnson could tell something significant had happened in his son’s life.

Jeremiah told his father that God had spoken to him while playing soccer with a group of children.

“He heard God speak to him, ‘Who will tell these children about me?’” Johnson said. “He said, ‘Dad, I have to go back.’”

In January 2010, Jeremiah was back on a plane to Mozambique.

“He was very active, energetic, an extremely easy-to-get-to-know individual,” said IMB missionary John Dina, who serves in Africa with his wife Wanne and their three children.

“And he didn’t mind sharing his opinion on things.”

“Jeremiah was 100 percent sold out (to missions),” added Dina, who attended Royal Palms Baptist when he and his family lived in the states. “We could see a real sincere call of God in his heart.”

Jeremiah used soccer as a way to engage the Moniga — a poor people, nearly all Muslim, who make their living as fishermen.

In just a couple of months, Jeremiah was quickly learning Portuguese, the local language, and helping to lead people to Christ. He also established several “preaching points” — where people would gather to hear the Good News.

“He had already memorized his testimony in Portuguese; he had memorized the ‘Roman Road’ in Portuguese,” Dina said. “He was impressive. My goal was that he could win somebody to the Lord before he left in Portuguese.”

While learning the language, Jeremiah worked closely with a local pastor who would translate and share the gospel with local people.

“(Jeremiah) would take a soccer ball with him and he would just spark up a soccer game anywhere,” Dina said. “And that would draw a crowd.”

Together, Jeremiah and the pastor presented the gospel, and people — including the 17 Jeremiah’s father would later baptize — turned their lives over to Jesus.

“We continue to disciple those believers,” Dina said. “He (Jeremiah) made an amazing contribution, and his contribution continues.”

Jeremiah was driving a motorcycle back from sharing the gospel in a Moniga village along the coast of Mozambique when he lost control, and he and a local pastor who was a passenger on the bike crashed along the road. The pastor suffered multiple injuries — mostly to his face — but Jeremiah died shortly after the accident. He left behind his parents; two sisters, Rachel and Talitha; and a brother, Merritt.

Many of the locals still speak of the sacrifice that Jeremiah made, Dina said.

“When there is a challenge before them, they’ll bring his name up.”

Though Johnson obviously wishes his son were alive today to continue what he started, he would not change where Jeremiah was when he died.

“I wanted him to follow the Lord, even if it meant dying,” he said. “That’s a hard thing, but that’s the truth.”

(EDITOR’S NOTE — James writes for the International Mission Board.)

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
5/3/2011 4:16:00 AM by Alan James, Baptist Press | with 0 comments



Jews, evangelicals search for ways to discuss Israel

May 3 2011 by Debra Rubin, Religion News Service

WASHINGTON — American Jews and evangelicals need a formal mechanism to discuss their differences and similarities on support for Israel, leaders from both sides said April 28 at the American Jewish Committee’s Global Forum 2011.

Rabbi Julie Schonfeld, executive vice president of the Conservative movement’s Rabbinical Assembly, spoke alongside Gary Bauer, president of American Values and a board member of Christians United for Israel, about Jewish groups’ concerns over evangelical support for Israel.

Much of the concern, Schonfeld said, has centered on theological beliefs — that “the current state of Israel is part of the (biblical) end of days scenario,” according to Christians, while Jews “value life in its present tense,” she said.

In addition, while Jewish groups value evangelicals’ strong support for Israeli security, the two sides tend to differ on such issues as rights for women and gays, and religion in the public sphere.

The differences also extend to how to support Israel. While Schonfeld said supporting Israel also means questioning its policies, Bauer called it “irresponsible to lecture Israelis on what they should or shouldn’t do.”

Nonetheless, Schonfeld said the “organized Jewish community does not really have a structure, a way to deepen these relationships.” There is, she said, “a need for more.”

Bauer agreed. “The need for continuing dialogue is incredibly important,” he said. 

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
5/3/2011 4:15:00 AM by Debra Rubin, Religion News Service | with 0 comments



Phoenix SBC: Commission focus, no night sessions

May 2 2011 by Mark Kelly, Baptist Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — “A Great Commission People with a Great Commandment Heart” will provide the focus for a June 14-15 Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) annual meeting in Phoenix that will be more compact and offer more opportunities for fellowship. A broad range of auxiliary activities also will be held, from Crossover 2011 evangelistic outreach events to the annual Pastors’ Conference and Woman’s Missionary Union annual meeting and missions celebration.

The SBC’s business sessions in the Phoenix Convention Center will include messengers’ consideration of recommendations from the SBC Executive Committee’s review of ethnic church and ethnic church leader participation in the convention.

Bryant Wright, president of the Southern Baptist Convention, said last year’s emphasis on “Great Commission Resurgence” laid the foundation for this year’s challenge to fulfill Christ’s disciple-making command.

“I’m very thankful for what Johnny Hunt and the GCR Task Force did in calling attention to the fact that we’re not baptizing as many, we’re not growing, that we’re not doing our part of fulfilling the Great Commission,” Wright said. “Now that we understand that, the fulfillment of the Great Commission is going to be front and center at the convention.

In January, the SBC’s Committee on Order of Business announced significant changes in the annual meeting schedule, including holding two missionary appointment services, fewer business sessions and no night sessions. Wright said the changes are designed to allow a greater focus on the Great Commission and free up time for fellowship, discussions and family.

“We’ve asked the North American Mission Board (NAMB) and the International Mission Board (IMB) to commission new missionaries during the meeting,” Wright said. “It’s very seldom that a church is able to experience a commissioning service. This is going to allow the churches of the convention to take part.

“Days at the convention are long and an important part of the annual meeting is fellowship, so you go to eat dinner with somebody that you haven’t seen in five years and the next thing you know it’s too late to get back to the evening session,” Wright said. “We’re going to go a little longer in the afternoon so people can have the evening free for fellowship with friends.”

The main addresses during the annual meeting, combined with a Pastors’ Conference focus on church planting, will inspire and challenge participants to take the gospel to a world in desperate need of Good News, Wright said.

“I realize Southern Baptists are just one part of God’s Kingdom. It takes Bible-believing Christians all around the world to fulfill the Great Commission,” Wright said. “But we really do have a wonderful opportunity to put the Great Commission front and center for Southern Baptists. We will have the focus of Kevin Ezell at NAMB on church planting, and also Vance Pitman’s focus in the Pastors’ Conference on church planting in the western United States, and we also will have myself and David Platt (preaching the convention message) and Tom Elliff at IMB (the mission board’s new president) challenging us to really get serious about reaching the unreached people groups of the earth.”

While there are many people groups where less than 2 percent of the population is Christian, there are 3,800 “unengaged” people groups that, as far as anyone knows, have no Christian witness at all, Wright said.

“It’s what’s on my heart. I know it’s what’s on Tom Elliff’s heart. The challenge we’re putting before churches is, let’s really make a commitment to engage the unengaged people groups with the gospel of Jesus Christ,” Wright said. “I have said I feel part of why we have had less focus on the Great Commission is that we have lost our first love of Jesus Christ. It’s important that we remember relationship with Christ is to be pre-eminent and when we really follow Jesus, then we’re going to have a passion for the lost.”

While Phoenix is a long way for most Southern Baptists to travel, Wright said he believes those who attend will be glad they got away from the day-to-day responsibilities of the local church to let the Lord speak to them.

“It’s good for Southern Baptists to go to places like Phoenix for our convention because it gives us a presence and it’s a way to encourage the churches in those communities,” Wright said. “When we come together, we also sense God moving among us with a passion to reach the unreached people groups, to plant churches in areas where there’s not a lot of witness for Christ. Being there together, the Holy Spirit just works among us, to give us a catalyst to move forward in faith.”

Wright also encouraged convention-goers to dress “business casual.”

“The heat of Phoenix is incredible. It will look kind of strange on the streets of Phoenix for people to be walking around in coats and ties in 110-degree heat,” Wright said. “So we’re encouraging people just to come business casual, even those on the platform. Dress comfortably for an incredibly warm climate.

“The fact the meeting is going to be compact, the fellowship time at night, the Great Commission focus — it’s going to be a very focused convention,” Wright said. “The convention president, the convention sermon, NAMB and IMB are all on the same page. We’re all in this together. That’s very exciting. For those who are interested in focusing on Christ’s Great Commission, it will be very exciting to be part of this.”

Crossover Phoenix
Southern Baptists coming to Phoenix for Crossover 2011 evangelistic outreach events will assist local churches and strengthen new congregations. Dozens of congregations will join volunteers at 70 ministry venues throughout the Phoenix-Tucson corridor, a 120-mile stretch encompassing 5.2 million residents.

Volunteers will share the love of Christ as they participate in block parties, prayerwalking excursions, Intentional Community Evangelism outreach projects and acts of kindness. Crossover 2011 also will directly impact and strengthen 10 new churches that are just starting in the five Baptist associations of the corridor.

To learn more about Crossover 2011, visit www.crossover2011.org. To assist new church plants in the Phoenix area, visit www.churchplantingvillage.net/crossover2011. For those unable to travel to Arizona this summer, Southern Baptists can join in an online prayer community at facebook.com/SBCpray4AZ or by following twitter.com/sbcpray4az.
(See related story.)  

Ethnic study
Messengers to the annual meeting will receive recommendations from the SBC Executive Committee’s review of ethnic church and ethnic church leader participation in the convention. Those recommendations, adopted by the EC Feb. 22, are designed “to foster conscious awareness of the need to be proactive and intentional in the inclusion of individuals from all ethnic and racial identities within Southern Baptist life.” Based on a motion presented at the 2009 SBC annual meeting in Louisville, Ky., an Executive Committee study group examined “how ethnic churches and ethnic church leaders can be more actively involved in serving the needs of the SBC through cooperative partnership on the national level.”

The group reviewed all resolutions adopted at annual meetings regarding ethnic participation and relationships; analyzed the ethnic identities of program personalities on the platform at recent annual meetings; studied the ethnic identities of entity staff, mission board personnel, seminary faculty and recent graduates; and heard testimonies from ethnic leaders.

Also part of the study was a review of the numbers of ethnic congregations and ethnic members within the SBC, pictorial representations in convention literature, coverage of ethnic diversity in convention publications and a review of the ethnic identities of convention committees, boards and commissions.

Specific information about the recommendations being brought to messengers may be found at http://bpnews.net/bpnews.asp?id=34708.

Registration
Registration for the Phoenix annual meeting once again will provide churches with the online opportunity to register their messengers at www.sbc.net to avoid waiting at the counter upon arrival at the convention.

After online registration, the SBC website provides a church with a messenger reference number form to be printed out and presented by each messenger at the SBC registration booth in exchange for a nametag and a set of ballots. The appropriate church-authorized representative must complete all online registrations.

The traditional registration method also is available for those churches that are unable or may not opt to access the online registration. Registration cards are available from state convention offices.

For further information about online registration, hotel choices, parking and shuttle services for the SBC annual meeting, visit www.sbcannualmeeting.net.

Resolutions
Messengers wishing to propose resolutions must submit them at least 15 days prior to the annual meeting, giving the Resolutions Committee a two-week period in which to consider them. Detailed guidelines on submitting resolutions are available at www.sbcannualmeeting.net (by clicking on “Resolutions”). Resolutions may be submitted online but must be followed up by a letter of credentials from the submitter’s church.

Children and youth
Registration for families to enroll their children in preschool childcare and the children’s conference in the Phoenix Convention Center is available under the “Children & Students” tab at www.sbcannualmeeting.net.

Childcare for newborns through 3-year-olds will be available from Sunday evening through Wednesday, June 12-15. There is a non-refundable registration fee of $10 per child for preschool care. This fee is in addition to the session fees for the convention. The cost per session is $5 per child, not to exceed $40 per family, plus the $10 non-refundable registration fee. Lunch also will be available for preschoolers on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at $5 per meal. Complete payment is due for all sessions, and lunch if selected, no later than arrival at the first session.

Registration is being handled exclusively online at www.sbcannualmeeting.net. The deadline for preschool childcare registration is June 1 and is limited to 150 children per session. Parents wanting to register their children after June 1 may print the required information and bring it to Phoenix, where they will be registered on-site on a space-available basis. Questions about this year’s childcare can be directed to childcare@sbc.net.

Children’s Conferences International will provide an age-graded, Scripture-based conference for all children ages 4-12. This year’s theme, “Ride the Waves!” will include fun songs, crafts, stories, skits and games. The cost for children ages 4-6 is $50 per child for the four days of the children’s conference, Sunday evening through Wednesday. The registration for Monday through Wednesday is $45 per child, $40 per child for Tuesday through Wednesday registration.

Questions about the children’s conference program can be phoned to Children’s Conferences International at (317) 447-8213 or (586) 879-8421 or e-mailed to info@childrensconferences.com. The deadline for enrollment is June 1 and is limited to 400 children. Parents wanting to register their children after June 1 may inquire at the first session, where they will be registered on-site on a space-available basis.

Information about the Fuge camp for grades 6 through 12, yet to be released, will be posted through www.sbcannualmeeting.net.

(EDITOR’S NOTE — Kelly is an assistant editor and senior writer for Baptist Press. For complete information on the SBC annual meeting in Phoenix, visit www.sbcannualmeeting.net.)

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)

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5/2/2011 8:49:00 AM by Mark Kelly, Baptist Press | with 0 comments



Crossover ’11 to strengthen church plants

May 2 2011 by Adam Miller, Baptist Press

PHOENIX — Southern Baptists coming to Phoenix for Crossover 2011 will aid an oasis of local churches Saturday, June 11, in ministering to the spiritual thirst in their communities.

Crossover will mark its 23rd year as the key evangelistic outreach event prior to the Southern Baptist Convention’s annual meeting, slated June 14-15 in Phoenix.

Dozens of congregations will join volunteers — from Arizona and across the nation — at 70 ministry venues throughout the Phoenix-Tucson corridor, a 120-mile stretch encompassing 5.2 million residents. The North American Mission Board (NAMB) is working with the local Crossover coordinating team to provide volunteers with opportunities to share the love of Christ as they participate in block parties, prayerwalking excursions, Intentional Community Evangelism outreach projects and acts of kindness.

“We’re excited about getting our churches into the streets and sharing the Gospel with our community,” said Jerry Martin, associational missionary for the Valley Rim Baptist Association and Crossover coordinator for the Arizona Southern Baptist Convention.

“We want to be a presence in our communities and begin to make a difference in unreached places,” Martin said in asking Southern Baptists to pray for Arizona Baptists as they prepare for the June outreach.

Photo by James Dotson

Cheri Mills, a member of St. Stephen Baptist Church in Louisville, Ky., prays with Autiyana Evans as part of an Orlando Intentional Community Evangelism outreach. The girl made a profession of faith in Christ at Crossover 2010.


What makes this year’s Crossover events unique to the decades-long tradition is that it will directly impact and strengthen 10 new churches that are just starting in the five Baptist associations of the Phoenix-Tucson corridor — Central, Estralla, Valley Rim, Gila and Catalina Baptist associations.

“We are so delighted that our (SBC) family is coming out,” said Steve Bass, executive director for the Arizona Southern Baptist Convention. “Our people had a great experience in 2003 and they’re absolutely looking forward to this. I think all up and down the line we are grateful for Southern Baptists who come and help engage the harvest field.”

Crossover will help existing churches identify and engage their neighborhoods, Bass added. The event also will help spread the word about the new church plants, many of which are only beginning to form relationships and core groups in their communities.

“Many of our churches need to be introduced or reintroduced to their neighborhoods. Crossover makes that happen,” Bass said. “Pastors and churches need encouragement. To have the Southern Baptist family come and walk with them in their neighborhoods or work with them at a block party is incredibly encouraging. It’s absolutely a blessing to us.”

New church starts participating in Crossover 2011 in Phoenix are Valley Life Church with pastor Brian Bowman; Symbiotic Church with pastor Dennis Conner; International Baptist Ministries Fellowship with pastor Yaw Poku; and El Puente Church with pastor Armando Barraza.

Other church starts in the area that are participating are Vintage Church in Tucson with pastor Tommy Russell; Community Church of Red Rock with pastor Jimmie Woods; Mission Point Baptist Fellowship in Chandler with pastor Bill May; International Baptist Ministries Fellowship in Gilbert with pastor Yaw Poku; Silent Hope Ministries, a church to the deaf in Mesa with pastor Jeremy Fass; Seyenna Vista Apartments Church in Mesa with pastor Louis Spears; and New Jerusalem Missionary in El Mirage with pastor Clarence Bradley.

“We have 30,000 homes in this area with no church around,” said Bowman of the new Valley Life Church. Sent in January by the Mullins Baptist Association in Oklahoma, Bowman is in the beginning stages of developing a core group, with plans to make a splash during Crossover in local shopping centers and neighborhoods.

Valley Life Church will not officially launch until next year, but Bowman hopes Crossover will provide follow-up opportunities that will prove crucial to a successful start.

“Our challenge is getting our name out there and gaining exposure,” Bowman said. “At Crossover we’re able to take over this huge parking lot in the community of Norterra. We’ll be giving away movie tickets. We’ll have bounce houses and a block party at this shopping center.”

NAMB church planting missionary Louis Spears noted that one in three residents in greater Phoenix lives in multifamily housing communities that are closed to door-to-door witnessing. And only 3 percent ever leave their communities to attend church. The Valley Rim Baptist Association has made it a priority to start churches in such settings.

Steve Bass also highlighted the vibrant work among the international communities, including ministry among Hispanics and Chinese.

“Our Hispanic ministries are leading the way in gathering volunteers and casting vision for reaching Spanish speakers,” Bass said.

Among the multi-ethnic Crossover events will be outreach efforts and block parties hosted by 16 of the state’s 23 Hispanic churches. The group will gather Sunday, June 5, for a Hispanic rally of local churches, spend the week doing outreach to Spanish speakers, finish with block parties throughout the city and hold a celebration of the week’s successes during the weekend before the SBC annual meeting.

Bass noted some challenges as well.

“One challenge is having an outdoor event in June in Phoenix,” he said, alluding to the sweltering heat. “Another challenge is that while we are the largest evangelical group in Arizona, we’re not the only religious group here spreading their message. We have to distinguish ourselves from the LDS (Latter-day Saints) and the Jehovah’s Witnesses who also go door to door and have a huge influence out here.

“You never make a clear presentation of the Gospel in a vacuum,” Bass added.

“You’re always presenting over and against competing views.”

Since its beginning in 1989 in Las Vegas, Crossover has provided Southern Baptists an opportunity to collectively shine light in communities across North America as equipped churches and incoming volunteers mobilize to encourage each other and make disciples.

“I hope thousands of Southern Baptists arrive early for the convention this year to participate in Crossover,” said Kevin Ezell, president of the North American Mission Board. “What’s so exciting is that after we leave, the new churches we’re helping will be reaching people for Christ and making disciples for years to come. I’m thankful that Steve Bass at the Arizona Southern Baptist Convention and the local associations near Phoenix are making church planting such a priority for Crossover this year.”

To learn more about Crossover 2011, visit www.crossover2011.org. To assist new church plants in the Phoenix area, visit www.churchplantingvillage.net/crossover2011. For those unable to travel to Arizona this summer, Southern Baptists can join in an online prayer community at facebook.com/SBCpray4AZ or by following twitter.com/sbcpray4az.

(EDITOR’S NOTE — Miller is a writer for the North American Mission Board.)

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)

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5/2/2011 8:38:00 AM by Adam Miller, Baptist Press | with 0 comments



Pastors aspire to join God’s activity

May 2 2011 by Baptist Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A diverse lineup of speakers and a focus on God’s Kingdom will amplify the theme of the 2011 SBC Pastors’ Conference: “Aspire: Yearning to join God’s kingdom activity.” The June 12-13 gathering, held in Phoenix prior to the Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting in the Phoenix Convention Center, is intended to help pastors see “the big picture of what God is doing in the world” and rise above preoccupations with temporary issues, said Pastors’ Conference President Vance Pitman, church planter and lead pastor of Hope Baptist Church in Las Vegas. Pitman said he is praying 1,000 churches will commit themselves during the conference to plant churches in “pioneer areas” of North America. Also, part of the annual offering taken during the gathering will be used to finish translating the “JESUS” film into the language of an unreached people group in the Arabian Peninsula.

BP photo

This year’s 2011 Southern Baptist Convention will be at the Phoenix Convention Center. Most of the meetings will be at this facility or nearby.


The remainder of the offering will be used to conduct pastors’ conferences on two continents that will use national leadership to assist church leaders in about 20 countries, Pitman said.

The conference website, www.sbcpc.net, lists the event’s speakers as including Rick Warren of Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, Calif.; Ken Whitten of Idlewild Baptist Church in Tampa, Fla.; Afshin Ziafat of Providence Church in Frisco, Texas; Louie Giglio of Passion City Church in Atlanta; Bob Roberts of Northwood Church in Keller, Texas; Peter Ndhlovu of Bible Gospel Church in Africa in Lusaka, Zambia; Paul Gotthardt of Life Baptist Church in Las Vegas; Darrin Patrick of The Journey Church in St. Louis; Gregg Matte of First Baptist Church in Houston; evangelist Bob Pitman of Muscle Shoals, Ala.; and Johnny Hunt of First Baptist Church in Woodstock, Ga.

“If you look at every one of these guys, their theology and methodology has not become an obstacle for them in engaging the nations with the gospel,” Pitman said. “Every one of them is engaged in multiplying the church and working among the nations, recognizing that is the big picture of what God is doing.”

Pastor’s wives conference
The annual Pastors’ Wives Conference will follow the same theme of “Aspire” of the Pastors’ Conference, with Kay Warren as the keynote speaker, wife of Pastor Rick Warren. The conference will be held from 8:30-11:45 a.m. Monday, June 13, the North Ballroom A/B of the Phoenix Convention Center. There is no cost for the event and registration is not required. Women who serve in any area of local church leadership, missions and denominational work are invited to join ministers’ wives in attendance.  

Ministers’ wives lunch
Anne Wright, president of the 2011 SBC Ministers’ Wives’ Luncheon, is using the theme “Influential Joy” for the ministers’ wives’ luncheon.

The luncheon will begin at noon Tuesday, June 14, in the North Ballroom A/B/C of the Phoenix Convention Center. Lisa Harper from the Women of Faith tour will speak, and Kim Hill, a Grammy-nominated and Dove Award-winning artist, will sing. The luncheon is open to all wives of ministers. Tickets may be purchased in advance for $15 through LifeWay Women’s Events at www.lifeway.com or (800) 254-2022. At the door, the ticket cost will be $20. Women who wish to serve as table hostesses may contact Sandy Beetler of Johnson Ferry Baptist Church at sandy.beetler@jfbc.org or (770) 794-2982.  

NAMB — pastor’s conference lunch
Kevin Ezell, the mission board’s president, will explain his “Send North America” vision during a Pastors’ Conference luncheon at noon June 13 in Room 120 C/D of the Phoenix Convention Center. The luncheon for pastors, church staff and other leaders also will feature Ed Stetzer of LifeWay Christian Resources and worship leader Chris Mills. Seating is limited, and tickets are available at www.namb.net/SNAluncheon for $7 each.

Chaplains
Ezell also will speak at the annual SBC Chaplains’ Luncheon slated for June 13 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Room 124 of the convention center. Reservations are required. This year’s chaplains’ luncheon will recognize Maj. Gen. Douglas Carver, who is retiring this year as U.S. Army Chief of Chaplains.

Directors of mission
Directors of mission are invited to worship at 11 a.m. June 12 at North Phoenix Baptist Church followed by a lunch with O.S. Hawkins of GuideStone Financial Resources. There will be morning breakout sessions June 13 followed by times with Ezell and Elliff.
Coffee and fellowship time starts the day at 9 and there will be a luncheon for new DOMs at 11:45. To register, visit www.sbcadom.net and complete the registration form.

Woman’s Missionary Union
“Proclaim!” will be theme drawn from Luke 4:18—19 for speakers, breakout conferences and music during the WMU Missions Celebration and Annual Meeting, June 12—13 in Phoenix.  

Ginger Smith, executive director of the Mission Centers of Houston (Texas), will be the keynote speaker.  

There will be three general sessions: Sunday, June 12, at 7 p.m.; and Monday, June 13, at 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. A special missions feature facilitated by Gordon Fort, vice president for overseas operations with the International Mission Board, is slated on Monday at 11 a.m. Breakout sessions will be offered on Sunday from 2:30—5 p.m. and on Monday from 2-4:30 p.m. Debby Akerman, president of national WMU, will give her presidential address during the Monday morning session. Tangena Mishler will lead in worship along with pianist Nancy Grainger.

This year’s celebration will be in the Grand Ballroom of the Wyndham Phoenix Downtown Hotel, two blocks from the Phoenix Convention Center.  

Participants are encouraged to bring school supplies to help with an ongoing ministry at Seyenna Vistas, a 67-acre mobile home and RV park in Phoenix with more than 100 children in grades 1—6. There is no charge to attend and no preregistration is required. Onsite registration opens on Sunday at 2 p.m. Visit www.wmu.com for more information.  

COSBE
Messengers to the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention are invited to a Sunday morning worship service sponsored by the Conference of Southern Baptist Evangelists (COSBE) June 12 at 9 a.m. in the Valley of the Sun Ballroom at the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel.  

Speakers include Harold Hunter, president of Trinity College of the Bible and Theological Seminary in Newburgh, Ind.; Brian Fossett, a former COSBE president; and Eric Fuller, a young evangelist. The theme is “Ageless Urgency.”

After the worship service, COSBE members will enjoy a fellowship meal and mini-retreat at 12:30 p.m. followed by a COSBE business meeting from 3-5 p.m.

Seminary lunches
The six Southern Baptist seminaries will hold their annual alumni luncheons on Wednesday June 15 during the SBC annual meeting.

Golden Gate Seminary — 12:15 p.m.; $10 per person; Phoenix Convention Center North Building, Rooms 227 A/B/C on Level 200. Call (888) 442-8709 or email rsvp@ggbts.edu.

Midwestern Seminary — Noon; $15 per person; Phoenix Convention Center’s North Building, Rooms 124 A & B, Street Level. Call (816) 414-3720 or email IAoffice@mbts.edu, and include complete names of all attendees and your cell phone and email address. Reservations are due before June 9.

New Orleans Seminary — $20 per person if purchased by May 31 ($25 afterward); Phoenix Convention Center’s North Ballroom (Room 120A, North Building). Send a check payable to NOBTS to New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, Attention Alumni Relations, 3939 Gentilly Blvd., New Orleans, LA 70126 or purchase online at www.nobts.edu.

Southeastern Seminary — Noon; $25 per person; rooms 129A and 129B in the North Building of the Phoenix Convention Center; visit http://sebts.edu/alumni/events/default.aspx.

Southern Seminary — 12:30 p.m.; $20 per person; Phoenix Convention Center’s North Building, Room 120D, Level 100; call (502) 897-4142 or by e-mail Retta Draper at rdraper@sbts.edu.

Southwestern Seminary — Noon; $20 per person; Phoenix Convention Center’s North Ballroom, Room 120 on Level 100; visit www.swbts.edu/sbclunch or call (877) GO SWBTS (467-9287).

NAAF  
The National African American Fellowship’s annual banquet is 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 14, in Room 129 A/B, Level 100, at the Phoenix Convention Center.

The Sunday worship service is slated 6:30 p.m. June 12 at Canaan Missionary Baptist Church, 931 S. Stapley Drive in Mesa. The annual NAAF business meeting, including the election of officers, will be at 4 p.m. Monday in Room 230, Level 200, of the convention center.

Dixon, NAAF’s president, said the business session will include a discussion of the four new strategies NAAF is embracing.

Black network
The Black Southern Baptist Denominational Servants Network’s annual meeting will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, June 12, at Canaan Missionary Baptist Church in Mesa, Ariz., 931 S. Stapley Drive in Mesa, a Phoenix suburb about 20 miles east of the Phoenix Convention Center, site of the 2011 SBC annual meeting.

On Saturday, June 11, the network will host 80 or more church leaders for an 8 a.m. “Recharging Your Sunday School” seminar at Canaan to be led by Elgia “Jay” Wells, Charles Grant and Curtis, all from LifeWay.

Filipino

The Filipino Southern Baptist Fellowship of North America will meet Tuesday, June 14 for a luncheon and meeting from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at North Phoenix Baptist Church, located at 5757 North Central Avenue, in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention in Phoenix. Kevin Ezell, president of the North American Mission Board, will be the featured speaker.
To register for the meeting, email Manao at rmanao@aol.com or call (610) 580-8635.  

Native Americans
The Fellowship of Native American Christians (FoNAC), scheduled to meet June 13 in Phoenix, will discuss the need for an executive director and a regional liaison network with Indian churches in state conventions, according to Emerson Falls, president of the Southern Baptist ethnic fellowship. The FoNAC meeting, from 10 a.m. to noon Monday, June 13, will be in Room 226A of the North Building at the Phoenix Convention Center. Anyone with an interest in ministry with Native Americans is invited to attend.

Messianic
The Southern Baptist Messianic Fellowship will meet June 10-11 in Phoenix for the task of reaching Jews with the gospel. The fellowship’s annual meeting will begin at 7 p.m. Friday, June 10, with praise and worship and a welcome message from vice president Ric Worshill at CrossPoinTempe Church at 1001 East Southern Ave. in Tempe, Ariz., followed by an Oneg Shabbat meal. The church is 12 miles southeast of the Phoenix Convention Center.

On Saturday, praise and worship will begin at 8:30 a.m., and Bruce Stokes, dean of the school of behavioral sciences at California Baptist University in Riverside, will speak.

People who plan to attend the event should send an email to msaffle@cox.net to assist the organizers in preparations.

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)

Related stories
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5/2/2011 8:16:00 AM by Baptist Press | with 0 comments



Nominees for SBC committees

May 2 2011 by Baptist Press

NASHVILLE — Nominees to serve on the Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee, the four denominational boards — International Mission Board, North American Mission Board, LifeWay Christian Resources, and GuideStone Financial Resources, the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC), the six seminaries, and the Committee on Order of Business have been selected by the 2011 SBC Committee on Nominations.

Nominees will serve if elected by the messengers to the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention, June 14-15 in Phoenix, Ariz.:

North Carolina Baptists have been appointed to the Committee on Committees as well as the IMB, LifeWay, ERLC, and Southeastern and New Orleans seminaries.

Executive Committee (83 members): 19 nominations considered; 7 new members; 12 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2015 replacing members ineligible for re-election include Pat Pavlian, layperson and member of Immanuel Baptist Church, Highland, Calif., replacing Martin F. Davis, San Diego, Calif.; James A. Ray, layperson and member of Calvary Baptist Church, Clearwater, Fla., replacing Randall L. James, Orlando, Fla.; William V. (Bill) Prince, layperson and member of Prince Avenue Baptist Church, Bogart, Ga., replacing William F. (Bill) Harrell, Martinez, Ga.; Bill D. Whittaker, retired pastor and member of Glasgow Baptist Church, Glasgow, Ky., replacing Richard E. (Rick) Bowden, Louisville, Ky.; M. Kent Choate, senior pastor, Broadway Baptist Church, Sand Springs, Okla., replacing Douglas O. (Doug) Melton, Oklahoma City, Okla.

Also nominated for term to expire in 2015 is Tim W. Brasher, layperson and member of First Southern Baptist Church, Scottsdale, Ariz., replacing Don E. McDaniel, Phoenix, Ariz., who resigned; Eddie W. Dehondt, associate pastor, Rose Park Baptist Church, Shreveport, La., replacing James B. Law, Gonzales, La., who declined to serve a second term.

Nominated for a second term are Steven W. Loggins, Mt. Olive, Ala.; Jay F. Shell, Batesville, Ark.; Roger L. Spradlin, Bakersfield, Calif.; Christopher D. (Chris) Metcalf, Lihue, Hawaii; Lovina K. Rush, Kearney, Mo.; David W. King, Albuquerque, N.Mex.; L. Douglas (Doug) Passmore, Lawton, Okla.; Procopio U. DeLeon, Pitman, N.J.; J. Paul Fleming, Greenville, S.C.; David C. Perdue, Cordova, Tenn.; David Dykes, Tyler, Tex.; Carol A. Yarber, Malakoff, Tex.

GuideStone Financial Resources (44 members): 13 nominations considered; 11 new members; 2 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2015 replacing members ineligible for re-election include Rick L. Lance, state executive director and member of Vaughn Forest Baptist Church, Montgomery, Ala., replacing Frankie J. Smitherman, Mobile, Ala.; John T. Raymond, layperson and member of First Baptist Church, Jacksonville, Fla., replacing James B. (Jim) Henry, Orlando, Fla.; Terry A. Kilgore, layperson and member of First Southern Baptist Church, Liberal, Kans., replacing Mary C. Dighton, Lenexa, Kans.; Rob S. Gibson, pastor, North Oldham Baptist Church, Goshen, Ky., replacing Gregory A. (Greg) Bibb, Lexington, Ky.; John D. Cameron, layperson and member of First Baptist Church, West Monroe, La., replacing Darryl J. Hoychick, Pineville, La.; David W. Morley, layperson and member of First Baptist Church, Enid, Okla., replacing James R. (Jim) Scrivner, Ada, Okla.; Michael S. Hamlet, pastor, First Baptist North Sparbanburg, Spartanburg, S.C., replacing Timothy E. (Tim) Head, Mt. Pleasant, S.C.; Scott Turner, layperson and member of Prestonwood Baptist Church, Plano, Tex., replacing Ronald D. (Ron) Murff, Plano, Tex.; Kenneth C. Price, layperson and member of Beaverdam Baptist Church, Beaverdam, Va., replacing Robert A. (Bob) Harris, Jr., Colonial Heights, Va.

Nominated for term to expire in 2013 is J. Wesley Noss, pastor, New Hope Baptist Church, Versailles, Ky., replacing Charles Darren Gaddis, Corbin, Ky., who resigned.

Nominated for a second term are Danny H. (Dan) Coker, Sr., Phoenix, Ariz.; Thomas A. (Tom) Seel, Clarksville, Ind.; Joseph D. (Jody) Fail, Bay Springs, Miss.

International Mission Board (90 members): 23 nominations considered; 9 new members; 14 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2015 replacing members ineligible for re-election include Jay L. Wolf, pastor, First Baptist Church, Montgomery, Ala., replacing James W. (Jamey) Pruett, Prattville, Ala.; Don McDonald, layperson and member of First Baptist Church, Fort Smith, Ark., replacing Joseph W. (Joe) Hewgley, Rogers, Ark.; James D. Rivers, education/outreach pastor, First Baptist Church Moss Bluff, Lake Charles, La., replacing Kathy T. Towns, Arcadia, La.; Tim L. Simpson, pastor, Greenridge Baptist Church, Clarksburg, Md., replacing George Jack, Perryville, Md.; Robert G. (Gary) Barkley, minister of education and associate pastor, Pisgah Baptist Church, Excelsior Springs, Mo., replacing William D. (Bill) Curp, Festus, Mo.; Claude Anthony Smith, senior pastor, New Prospect Baptist Church, Anderson, S.C., replacing D. Allen McWhite, Travelers Rest. S.C.; Dean Haun, senior pastor, First Baptist Church, Morristown, Tenn., replacing John D. Floyd, Memphis, Tenn.

Also nominated for term to expire in 2015 is Max F. Croft, associate pastor, Agape Baptist Church, Scottsboro, Ala., replacing Linda Jean Applegarth, Montgomery, Ala., who declined to serve a second term; Kristen K. White, director of global mobilization and member of Magnolia Avenue Baptist Church, Riverside, Calif., replacing Lyle B. Paul, Gridley, Calif., who declined to serve a second term.

Nominated for a second term are William C. (Bill) Milewski, Kenai, Alaska; Stuart A. Bell, Centerton, Ark.; R. Blake Withers, Murrieta, Calif.; Andrew F. (Andy) Johnson, Washington, D.C.; Debora D. (Debbie) Brunson, Jacksonville, Fla.; Martha H. Wilson, Millen, Ga.; Jana T. Brown, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga.; Hershael W. York, Frankfort, Ky.; Marvin (Rick) Dunbar, Madison, Miss.; Michael A. (Mike) Penry, Raleigh, N.C.; Keith L. Stephenson, Rutherfordton, N.C.; Marshall D. Johnson, Irving, Tex.; James T. (Jay) Gross, Conroe, Tex.; Charlene D. Hahn, Norfolk, Va.

North American Mission Board (58 members): 17 nominations considered; 7 new members; 10 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2015, replacing members ineligible for re-election include Richard T. Wyatt, layperson and member of First Baptist Church, Brandon, Fla., replacing Timothy C. (Tim) Patterson, Jacksonville, Fla.; Gregory A. Varndell, senior pastor, Fairlawn Baptist Church, Parkersburg, W.V., replacing Rodney K. Hale, Ceredo, W.V.

Also nominated for term to expire in 2015 is David A. Parks, layperson and member of Porter Memorial Baptist Church, Lexington, Ky., replacing Peggy S. Ballou, Corbin, Ky., who declined to serve a second term.

Nominated for term to expire in 2014 is Lane R. Moore, assistant director of missions and member of Ellerbe Road Baptist Church, Shreveport, La., replacing Sharon Parker, Start, La., who resigned.

Nominated for term to expire in 2012 are Keith Fordham, layperson and member of Harps Crossing Baptist Church, Fayetteville, Ga., replacing Lester Cooper, Atlanta, Ga., who resigned.; David E. Washington, Jr., senior pastor, Canton Christian Fellowship, Canton, Mich., replacing Cameron Fuller, Williamsburg, Mich., who resigned; Barry K. Anderson, administrative pastor, Green Valley Baptist Church, Henderson, Nev., replacing Lisa M. Knutsen, Las Vegas, Nev., who resigned.

Nominated for a second term are Larry E. Gipson, Oneonta, Ala.; Ronald L. (Ronnie) Toon, Batesville, Ark.; Douglas K. (Doug) Dieterly, Plymouth, Ind.; Steven D. (Steve) Holdaway, Bellevue, Nebr.; J. Jason Pettus, Bowling Green, Ky.; John P. Wenberg, Overland, Mo.; Carroll E. Vaughn, Bloomfield, N.Mex.; James S. (Bud) Parrish, Lumberton, N.C.; Steven G. (Steve) Mayes, Amherst, Ohio; Patrick L. (Pat) Adams, Oklahoma City, Okla.

LifeWay Christian Resources (57 members): 14 nominations considered; 6 new members; 8 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2015, replacing members ineligible for re-election include Wayne G. Story, layperson and member of Cross Church, Springdale, Ark., replacing John D. Sagely, Fort Smith, Ark.; Michael J. (Mike) Stevens, administrative pastor, Bannockburn Baptist Church, Austin, Tex., replacing Mark Estep, Spring, Tex. Also nominated for term to expire in 2015 is Steve McNeil, team leader at the State Convention of Baptists in Indiana and member of Northside Baptist Church, Indianapolis, Ind., replacing Joe Mayes, North Vernon, Ind., who resigned.

Nominated for term to expire in 2013 are Paul R. Baxter, senior pastor, First Baptist Church, LaGrange, Ga., replacing Mary H. Cox, Lawrenceburg, Ga., who resigned; Timothy D. Turner, senior associate of education/administration, Porter Memorial Baptist Church, Lexington, Ky., replacing Larry J. Purcell, Hopkinsville, Ky., who resigned; Ronald G. (Ronnie) Smith, layperson and member of Broadmoor Baptist Church, Madison, Miss., replacing Justin D. Peters, Vicksburg, Miss., who resigned. Nominated for a second term are Lorie Honeycutt, Wellton, Ariz.; Judy Taylor, Harrisburg, Ill.; Carol L. Smith, Great Bend, Kans.; Adam W. Greenway, Mt. Washington, Ky.; Sharon B. Williams, Holt, Mich.; Mike B. Farris, Tonopah, Nev.; Simeon (Lee) Childs, Garner, N.C.; Jennie L. Hughes, Princeton, W.V.

Southern Seminary (43 members): 13 nominations considered; 4 new members; 9 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2016, replacing members ineligible for re-election include John A. Montgomery, dean of spiritual life, California Baptist University and member of Pathway Church, Redlands, Calif., replacing Larry Moxley, Bakersfield, Calif.; Nina J. Wilson, layperson and member of First Baptist Church, Manchesney Park, Ill., replacing Penny D. Davis, Decatur, Ill.; Marla R. Sanders, layperson and member of Highview Baptist Church, Louisville, Ky., replacing Randall L. Murray, Louisville, Ky. Nominated for term to expire in 2012 is Samuel S. (Sam) Rainer, senior pastor, First Baptist Church, Murray, Ky., replacing Craig A. Loscalzo, Lexington, Ky., who resigned.

Nominated for a second term are Edwin J. Hayes, Cullman, Ala.; Philip W. West, Valdosta, Ga.; Philip A. Gunn, Clinton, Miss.; Steve D. Gouge, Wilkesboro, N.C.; E. Todd Fisher, Shawnee, Okla.; L. Perrin Powell, Jr., Spartanburg, S.C.; Paul B. Taylor, Mauriceville, Tex.; Brian D. Autry, Moseley, Va.; J. Barry McRoberts, LaGrange, Ky.

Southwestern Seminary (40 members): 9 nominations considered; 4 new members; 5 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2016, replacing members ineligible for re-election include Robert E. Myers, senior pastor, Del Norte Baptist Church, Albuquerque, N.Mex., replacing Alan L. (Larry) Miller, Albuquerque, N.Mex.; Johnny H. Kelly, pastor, Westview Baptist Church, Martinsburg, W.Va., replacing Dorothy L. (Dottie) Tommey, Parkersburg, W.Va.

Nominated for term to expire in 2015 is Herschel D. Smith, director of missions and member of Northpoint Baptist Fellowship, Marqueite, Mich., replacing Mike Lee, Jackson, Mich., who resigned.

Nominated for term to expire in 2014 is Jonathan D. Leeman, layperson and member of Capitol Hill Baptist Church, Washington, D.C., replacing T. Michael Lawrence, Washington, D.C., who resigned.

Nominated for a second term are Danny L. Johnson, Bryant, Ark.; Lyman (Hutch) Hutcheson, Paducah, Ky.; H. Doyle Chauncey, Richmond, Va.; Johnny W. McGregor, Glen Rose, Tex.; Tony Mathews, Garland, Tex.

New Orleans Seminary (40 members): 11 nominations considered; 5 new members; 6 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2016, replacing members ineligible for re-election include Kenneth W. White, layperson and member of El Bethel Baptist Church, Fort Washington, Md., replacing Danny M. Crow, Columbia, Md.; Leland H. Crawford, pastor, First Baptist Church, Minden, La., replacing T. C. French, Jr., Baton Rouge, La. Also nominated for term to expire in 2016 is Jerry W. Price, director of missions and member of First Baptist Church, West Monroe, La., replacing Lawson L. Swearingen, Hammond, La., who declined to serve a second term.

Nominated for term to expire in 2014 are Frank Cox, senior pastor, North Metro First Baptist Church, Lawrenceville, Ga., replacing James Anderson, Warner Robins, Ga., who resigned; Melanie H. Hart, layperson and member of Faith Community Church Lakeside, McMurray, Pa., replacing Terry Douglas, Peach Bottom, Pa., who resigned.

Nominated for a second term are Lonnie Riley, Harlan, Ky.; Donald L. (Don) Currence, Ozark, Mo.; Jeffrey L. Black, Pittsfield, Mass.; Steven A. Jirgal, Monroe, N.C.; Caudle J. (C. J.) Adkins, Huntington, W.Va.; Dean Stewart, Purvis, Miss.

Southeastern Seminary (30 members): 8 nominations considered; 4 new members; 4 renominations.

Nominee with term to expire in 2016, replacing member ineligible for re-election is Jason Allen, lead pastor, Life Connection Church, Independence, Mo., replacing Ronald W. Cherry, Plano, Tex.

Also nominated for term to expire 2016 is Jerry Smith, pastor, Faith Baptist Church, Andover, Kans., replacing Patrick (Pat) Hudson, Haysville, Kans., who resigned. Nominated for term to expire in 2013 is Joe Forrester, layperson and member of Hebron Baptist Church, Dacula, Ga., replacing Stephen E. Batts, Newnan, Ga., who resigned. Nominated for term to expire in 2012 is David Brown, senior associate pastor, Applewood Baptist Church, Wheat Ridge, Colo., replacing Michael K. McCarthy, Silverthorne, Colo., who resigned.

Nominated for a second term are J. Stacy Davidson, Jackson, Miss.; Kevin L. Apperson, North Las Vegas, Nev.; Christopher J. Griggs, Denver, N.C.; Henry G. Williamson, Jr., Winston-Salem, N.C.

Midwestern Seminary (35 members): 7 nominations considered; 4 new members; 3 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2016, replacing members ineligible for re-election include Michael G. (Mike) McCoy, associate director of missions and member of Holland Baptist Church, Holland, Mich., replacing Larry E. Hoffman, Centralia, Ill.; Charles W. Campbell, associate executive director and member of Delta Church, Springfield, Ill., replacing Patrick McKay, Flanders, N.Y.; Margaret N. Godwin-Opara, layperson and member of Immanuel Baptist Church, Wichita, Kans., replacing Patricia Bowen, Little Rock, Ark.; Duncan P. K. Locke, pastor, Lincoln Avenue Baptist Church, Jacksonville, Ill., replacing Clarence Nolan Duke, Belton, Mo.

Nominated for a second term are Richard L. Baker, Springfield, Mo.; Kevin L. Shrum, Nashville, Tenn.; Donald L. (Don) Paxton, Abingdon, Va.

Golden Gate Seminary (39 members): 8 nominations considered; 4 new members; 4 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2016, replacing members ineligible for re-election include C. Keith Goeking, layperson and member of Frederick Boulevard Baptist Church, St. Joseph, Mo., replacing James Keith Vawter, Mansfield, Mo.; Roger D. Webb, student pastor, Grace Baptist Church, Tullahoma, Tenn., replacing Robert M. (Bob) Fargarson, Brownsville, Tenn.; Terry M. Turner, pastor, Mesquite Friendship Baptist Church, Mesquite, Tex., replacing Jane U. (Janie) Finlay, Houston, Tex.; Seung Hwan Choi, pastor, Korean Baptist Church, San Jose, Calif., replacing Misty W. Turco, Riverside, Calif.

Nominated for a second term are Ronald J. Sweetman, Upper Marlboro, Md.; Gregory P. (Greg) Byman, Fort Wayne, Ind.; Joseph L. Bunce, Albuquerque, N.Mex.; Mike McGuffee, Clovis, Calif.

Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (34 members): 9 nominations considered; 3 new members; 6 renominations.

Nominees with term to expire in 2015, replacing members ineligible for re-election include Tammie F. Andrews, layperson and member of Prairie Home Baptist Church, Kearney, Mo., replacing L. Doug Austin, Girardeau, Mo.; Michael R. Stike, layperson and member of Wrightsdale Baptist Church, Peach Bottom, Pa., replacing Steven F. Baker, Gettysburg, Pa.; Barry K. Creamer, interim pastor, Lake Highlands Baptist Church, Dallas, Tex., replacing Gene Kendrick, Conroe, Tex.

Nominated for a second term are Stephen L. Faith, New Albany, Ind.; Gregory K. (Greg) Barefoot, Statesville, N.C.; Stephen W. Long, Perrysburg, Ohio; Patrick G. Kinnison, Broken Arrow, Okla.; Ronnie J. Wilburn, Jackson, Tenn.; H. Ray Newman, Sr., Lawrenceville, Ga.

Committee on Order of Business (7 members): 2 nominations considered; 2 new members.

Nominees with term to expire in 2014, replacing members ineligible for re-election include Marvin G. Parker, pastor, Broadview Missionary Baptist Church, Broadview, Ill., replacing Emerson E. Falls, Oklahoma City, Okla.; David Smith, director of missions and member of Hyde Park Baptist Church, Austin, Tex., replacing Will H. Langford, Independence, Ky.

Wright appoints Committee on Committees  

PHOENIX, Ariz.  —  Appointments to the Southern Baptist Convention’s Committee on Committees have been announced by SBC President Bryant Wright.

The Committee on Committees will assemble in Phoenix, Ariz., just prior to the June 14-15 SBC annual meeting to nominate members of the Committee on Nominations, who, in turn, nominate trustees to serve on boards of the various entities of the SBC. SBC Bylaw 19 also provides that the Committee on Committees “shall nominate all special committees authorized during the sessions of the Convention not otherwise provided for.” The Committee on Committees has 70 members, two from each of the 35 state or regional conventions qualified for representation on boards of SBC entities.

The North Carolina appointed members are Andy Davis of First Baptist Church in Durham and Rick Langston of The Summit Church in Durham.

Gregg Matte, pastor of Houston’s First Baptist Church, Houston, Texas, has been designated to serve as committee chairman.

The other committee members are:

Alabama — Danny Wood, Shades Mountain Baptist Church, Birmingham; Roy Hill, First Baptist Church, Satsuma.

Alaska — Ruby Stogsdill, First Baptist Church, Soldotna; Jack Sherman, First Baptist Church, Palmer.

Arizona — Susan Bellflower, First Baptist Church, Phoenix; Steve Hanna, Emmanuel Baptist Church, Tucson.

Arkansas — Scott Maze, First Baptist Church, Van Buren; Donnie Edwards, Dallas Avenue Baptist Church, Mena.

California — Reta Beall, Lincoln Hill Community Church, San Rafael; Deryl Lackey, Iglesia Bautista Emmanuel, Riverside.

Colorado — Steve Turrentine, Pikes Peak Park Baptist Church, Colorado Springs; Ray Shirley, Monument Baptist Church, Grand Junction.

District of Columbia — Deepak Reju, Capitol Hill Baptist Church, Washington, D.C.; Matt Merker, Capitol Hill Baptist Church, Washington, D.C.

Florida — John Bozard, First Baptist Church, Orlando; Steve Morris, First Baptist Church, Plant City.

Georgia — Darrell Henry, Oakwood Baptist Church, Chickamauga; Michael Bass, Greenwood Baptist Church, Valdosta.

Hawaii — Patrick Underwood, Mililani Baptist Church, Mililani; Chris Martin, Lahaina Baptist Church, Lahaina.

Illinois — Michael Allen, Uptown Baptist Church, Chicago; Mark Emerson, Living Faith Baptist Church, Sherman.

Indiana — Scott Miller, Graceland Baptist Church, Graceland; Don Morris, First Baptist Church North Vernon, North Vernon.

Kansas-Nebraska — Derrick Lynch, Blue Valley Baptist Church, Overland Park, Kan.; Charles Boswell, Immanuel Baptist Church, Wichita, Kan.

Kentucky — Charles Barnes, Hurstbourne Baptist Church, Louisville; Robert Lowery, First Baptist Church, Central City.

Louisiana — Ray Raney, First Baptist Church, Bossier City; Bert Langley, Calvary Baptist Church, Alexandria.

Maryland-Delaware — Fred Caudle, St. Charles First Baptist Church, St. Charles, Md.; Brian Corrick, Nanjemoy Baptist Church, Nanjemoy, Md.

Michigan — Kevin Knox, Eastgate Baptist Church, Burton; Sharon Greer, Roscommon Baptist Church, Roscommon.

Missouri — Kendra Franks, First Baptist Church, Branson; Matt Kearns, StoneBridge Community Church, Jefferson City.

Mississippi — Matt Buckles, First Baptist Church of Vicksburg, Vicksburg; Shawn Parker, First Baptist Church, Columbus.

New England — Samy Ibrahim, Arabic Baptist Church, Boston; Mark Smith, North Park Baptist Church, Bridgeport, Conn.

New Mexico — Dave McFadden, First Baptist of Portales, Portales; Gavin Vaughn, II, Hermosa Drive Baptist Church, Artesia.

Northwest — Marsha Gray, CrossPointe Baptist Church, Vancouver, Wash.; Scott Brewer, Meadowbrook Church, Redmond, Wash.

Nevada — David Pretlove, Life Church, Reno; Pei Jones, Green Valley Baptist Church, Henderson.

New York — Eddie Hatcher, Northside Baptist Church, Liverpool, N.Y.; Ted Harvey, Somerset Hills Baptist Church, Basking Ridge, N.J.

Ohio — Mark Wilson, North Fairfield Baptist Church, Hamilton; Rick Shoemaker, First Baptist Church, New Carlisle.

Oklahoma — Dennis Dawson, First Baptist Church, Lawton; Bob Green, Arrow Heights Baptist Church, Broken Arrow.

Pennsylvania-South Jersey — Roger Manao, Philadelphia Bible Church, International, Philadelphia; Aaron Harvie, Riverside Community Church, Horsham, Penn.

South Carolina — Marshall Blalock, First Baptist Church, Charleston; Brad Bessent, Beulah Baptist Church, Hopkins.

Tennessee — Roland Maddox, First Baptist Church, Sevierville; Michael Day, Bellevue Baptist Church, Cordova.

Texas — Terry Turner, Mesquite Friendship Baptist Church, Mesquite.

Utah-Idaho — Mike Gray, Canyons Baptist Church, Salt Lake City, Utah; Larry Maxwell, Mt. Idaho Baptist Church, Grangeville, Idaho.

Virginia — Randy Haun, Colonial Heights Baptist Church, Colonial Heights; Tim Piland, Nansemond River Baptist Church, Suffolk.

West Virginia — Todd Hill, Grace Baptist Church, Parkersburg; Warren Gilpin, Ansted Baptist Church, Ansted.

Wyoming — Peggy Nikkel, Mountain View Baptist Church, Mills; Guy Thomas, Sunrise Baptist Church, Casper.

SBC Credentials Committee named
Larry Craig of Southern Oaks Baptist Church in Tyler, Texas, will serve as chairman.

Other committee members, listed by state, are:

Arkansas — Greg Addison, First Baptist Church, Cabot; Jason Noel, Eastside Baptist Church, Paragould.

California — Frank Kingsley, Bryant Street Baptist Church, Yucaipa; T. A. Nguyen, Fellowship Church, Cacoima.

Florida — Otto Fernandez, Riverside Baptist Church, Miami.

Georgia — Tom Jones, Roswell Street Baptist Church, Marietta; Herman Parker, First Baptist Church, Bremen.

Kansas — Don Mayberry, Pleasant View Baptist Church, Derby.

Missouri — Pat Windham, First Baptist Church, Raytown.

Nevada — Benny Jo, Hana Korean Church, Las Vegas.

New Mexico — Richard Gomez, First Spanish, Fruit Avenue, Albuquerque.

Texas — Michael Waldrop, First Baptist Church, Keller.

Utah — Jason McNair, First Baptist Church, West Valley City.

West Virginia — Seth Polk, Cross Lanes Baptist Church, Cross Lanes; Matt Shamblin, North Charleston Baptist Church, St. Albans.

Tellers Committee named for SBC  
Eddie Miller of South Reno Baptist Church in Fernley, Nev., will serve as chairman.

Other committee members, listed by state, are:

Arkansas — Steve Martin, First Baptist Church, Flippin.

California — Pedro Ramirez, Iglesia Bautista White Road, San Jose; A . B. Vines, New Seasons Church, Spring Valley.

Georgia — Wayne Marcus, Toms Creek Baptist Church, Martin.

Illinois — Wes Fletner, Tabernacle Baptist, Decatur.

Kansas — Greg Savage, First Southern Baptist Church, Dodge City.

Missouri — Thor Madsen, New Covenant Baptist Church, Kansas City; Steve Patterson, First Baptist Church, Joplin; Betty Shinkle, Concord Baptist Church, Jefferson City.

Mississippi — Daniel Heeringa, First Baptist Church, Houston.

Nevada — Gary Harr, College Park Baptist Church, North Las Vegas; Francis Howard, CrossWord Church, Henderson.

Ohio — Tom Pendergrass, Urbancrest Baptist Church, Lebanon; Bruce Smith, Violet Baptist Church, Columbus.

Tennessee — Joe Jernigan, Bellevue Baptist Church, Cordova.

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5/2/2011 7:55:00 AM by Baptist Press | with 0 comments



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