NAMB offers early retirement incentive
    October 6 2010 by NAMB Staff

    ALPHARETTA, Ga.—Telling North American Mission Board staff “considerable change” is coming, president Kevin Ezell shared a retirement incentive with employees that will be the beginning of an overall reduction in force in the months ahead. Details of the incentive were shared at a meeting Sept. 30.

    “There are a lot of changes and some things coming down the road. I don’t know what all of those are,” Ezell told the NAMB staff. “Knowing that there are changes coming and not knowing who exactly that would involve, we wanted to offer an incentive to those who might already be thinking about retirement.”

    Ezell said it was important to announce the incentive at this time to coincide with a significant change GuideStone Financial Resources has announced in its annuity funding rate beginning Jan. 1, 2011. GuideStone is reducing the floor funding for its lifetime annuity payments from the current 6 percent to somewhere between 3 and 4 percent.

    Ezell described the incentive as “the first phase” in what will be a series of staff changes coming to NAMB.

    Under the plan, staff who are age 55 and older will be credited additional years of service so they can qualify for health insurance benefits. Additionally, a retirement incentive bonus will be paid, based on years of service.

    “To be sure we are being very clear—this is the very best incentive we could come up with,” Ezell said. “It’s the best option that will be available.”

    Ezell compared the changes coming to NAMB to a company that had been making washing machines and now will be making cars.

    “There is going to be considerable change,” Ezell said. “A lot of the changes will not be directed to competency of people because we are going to be doing some things so drastically different. What does that look like specifically, I don’t know yet. But we are working on that as fast as we can.”

    Currently, 258 people serve on NAMB’s staff in Alpharetta. An additional 34 direct-paid missionaries, who serve throughout North America, are also eligible for the incentive. Those taking advantage of the plan will need to retire by Dec. 31, 2010.

     

    10/6/2010 7:32:00 AM by NAMB Staff | with 7 comments




Comments
Gene Scarborough
Again---it is a classic conundrum: He who led his church to give minimums to missions must now enlist the same kinds of churches to give to Home Missions.

Isn't it funny that "what goes around comes around!"

Why couldn't he approach the short fund situation with [b]"let's all take a cut--including me--so that we keep our jobs and balance the budget."[/b]
10/9/2010 7:02:15 PM

artist28174@yahoo.com
But Brent loves it!
10/7/2010 10:26:33 PM

Riley
It seems to me that usurpers took control of the greatest missionary enterprise the world has ever seen and has been dismantling it bit by bit for thirty years. Who is surprised at these latest developments?
10/7/2010 10:12:20 PM

Brent Hobbs
Let's not forget that this summer the messengers to the SBC voted on a plan that included a massive reorganization of NAMB and it's mission. No one could have reasonably thought that meant there would be no changes in personnel. Is the offer not generous enough? That might be something to complain about. But the fact that this is happening is no surprise, and is, in fact, what we asked NAMB and Ezell to do.
10/7/2010 12:02:29 PM

Norman
Jack and Bill: You are likely correct in surmising that the board knew -- if not of his plan, which probably wasn't developed -- at least of his direction. What you might be missing is that is precisely why the board called him as president.
10/7/2010 11:49:45 AM

Bill
Thank you Jack. I believe that you have indeed spoken the truth.
10/7/2010 9:17:59 AM

Jack
Should we be concerned about this? YES! I am not buying the notion that he has no idea where this is leading. He does, but he fears critics will boondoggle his plan. By the way, the NAMB Board knows of this plan, and they too are fearful of the attacks. We need to remember this and seek the removal of the board before it's too late. Though I fear this ship has left the port, but I am still hopeful for a positive solution.
10/7/2010 9:02:51 AM

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