October 2010

God’s chastising called Judy Morris to missions

October 20 2010 by Mike Creswell

, BSC

When she retired after teaching fifth grade for 32 years, Judy Morris did not immediately start doing mission trips, though in earlier years she had vowed to do so after retirement.
 

Long active in First Baptist Church, Siler City, missions involvement was not on her calendar. She recalls vividly the moment her commitment changed.  
 

It was soon after Hurricane Katrina destroyed much of Louisiana and Mississippi in 2005. At 6 a.m. one Sunday she was working the crossword puzzle in the newspaper when suddenly somebody said, “You’re making excuses!”

“I looked around and there was no one,” she said. The voice continued, “You’re making excuses. When you were working, you said you would love to do things like help with Katrina, but you couldn’t because you said you were working; you’d love to do so after you were retired.

“Now you’re saying it’s hot down there, but you just got back from Las Vegas and it was 107 degrees out there. “You say you have a bad back, but you’re getting ready to go to New York on a tour. You have the time now. What’s your excuse?”

“He very firmly told me, ‘If I tell you to do something, I will empower you to do it.  Don’t worry about these little things. That will work out,’“ she said.

“It was a life-changing experience,” she said.

She soon got trained by N.C. Baptist Men in mass feeding and made two trips to serve in Gulfport, Miss., along with some 40,000 other North Carolina Baptist volunteers who responded over two years.

“It was an eye-opening experience to see the equipment, the organization and all the Baptists with the yellow shirts on,” she said.
Morris wept as she recalled how they would be walking through a store, wearing their yellow Baptist Men Disaster Relief T-shirts.

“People would come up to us with tears in their eyes, thanking us for being there,” she said.

She wept again as she recalled how they stood with members of First Baptist Church and sang, “Because He Lives.”

“When we stood to sing, those people had lived through what we were singing about. They were singing with such joy. It was awesome. It was just awesome,” she recalls.

She recalled being impressed by the Bible study led by Chuck Register, then the pastor of First Baptist Church, Gulfport. Register is now executive leader for the Church Planting and Missions Development Group at the Baptist State Convention. “We are so fortunate to have him with us,” she said.

This summer Morris led a 10-member team to Connecticut to help a Baptist church there reach out to their community. Four years after she quit making excuses, Judy Morris is still sold out to missions.  

“People don’t know until they’re touched by it,” she said.

N.C. Baptist Men are able to train, organize and coordinate for disaster relief and carry out 13 other ministries involving men, women and children because they are supported through the North Carolina Missions Offering.

(EDITOR’S NOTE — Creswell directs stewardship efforts at the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina.)
10/20/2010 10:14:00 AM by Mike Creswell

, BSC | with 0 comments



Some religious charities receive more despite overall drop

October 20 2010 by Adelle M. Banks, Religion News Service

Several of the nation’s largest religious charities reported increases in private support as nonprofits overall saw decreases in donations last year, The Chronicle of Philanthropy reported.

Feed the Children, which ranked fifth in the annual Philanthropy 400, had a 1.2 percent increase in private support, which totaled $1.19 billion. World Vision saw a 4.5 percent increase in its private support, which totaled $870 million, giving it the No. 9 rank on the list.

Catholic Charities USA was ranked third, with a 66 percent increase from the previous year — a figure that the social service organization has questioned. According to the publication, Catholic Charities’ private support totaled $1.28 billion.

“There’s a question about the accuracy of the percentage of increase, and we’re talking with The Chronicle of Philanthropy about it,” said Roger Conner, spokesman for Catholic Charities USA. Overall, donations to the country’s largest charities dropped by 11 percent last year.

The Salvation Army, which ranked second, saw a decrease of 8.4 percent in its private support, which totaled $1.7 billion. Food for the Poor, which ranked sixth, had a 27.6 percent drop in private donations, which totaled $1.07 billion.

Other religious organizations in the top 25 included:
  • Habitat for Humanity International, 3.8 percent decrease
  • Operation Blessing International, 16.4 percent increase
  • Campus Crusade for Christ, 2.3 percent decrease.
The publication bases its rankings on charities’ reports of cash and other gifts received from private sources.  
10/20/2010 10:12:00 AM by Adelle M. Banks, Religion News Service | with 0 comments



Compassion invigorates church, moves Dover pastor

October 19 2010 by Norman Jameson
, BR Editor

Don Davis’ doctoral thesis could read like his diary.

Davis, pastor for 12 years of Dover Baptist Church near Seagrove, is massaging his thesis into a book, to be published next spring, that will reflect his passion: “The Demise of Compassion: a casualty of the changing culture.”

Compassion flows through Davis’ veins and seasons his ministry with a flavor of love that is growing a church in numbers and in fellowship in ways it has not experienced in a generation.

Davis was nominated for recognition by his church because of his compassion as their pastor. Compassion is not a passive emotion says Davis, 61. It is proactive and costly.

Self-centeredness is replacing compassion as culture invades the church, he says. Instead of demonstrating the selflessness Jesus encouraged by doing good unto “the least of these,” neighbors are more likely to say “I hope he had insurance,” when tragedy strikes, Davis argues in his thesis submitted for his doctor of ministry degree from Liberty University Seminary.  

Demonstrating compassion
Davis gives each newborn the child’s first toy bear. After church each Sunday he gives to a child the flower his wife, Frankie, puts on his lapel before church.

Every Christmas he and Frankie purchase a gift for each child, with some extras to cover any visitors on distribution night. Church secretary Denise Greene roams the room to find visitors, and then writes their names on a gift so their name is called – much to their surprise and delight.

Why does the pastor extend himself this way? He says it is to thank his church family for letting him into their lives to share such intimate moments. “I appreciate this church letting me love them,” he says. “They allow me to be a part of their lives, to infiltrate and experience their joys along with their hurts. That’s what ministry is, laughing in their joys, crying when they’re hurting. It’s compassion.”

Davis encourages pastors to love people, minister to them, fill their needs, and “Christ will fill the pews.”

BR photo by Norman Jameson

Don Davis, pastor of Dover Baptist Church, enjoys two particular hobbies, including woodworking and painting. This golf cart and wagon holds candy that church children find. The portrait is of good friend Terry Rouse who died in 2007.


Dover, a rural church with 400 resident members, gives 20 percent of its income to missions, including 10 percent through the Cooperative Program, and baptized 43 in the past two years. Yet no houses are visible from the church. Dover is growing in numbers and spirit because the church has “reclaimed compassion” in its body, Davis says. He said the church needs to reclaim the compassion that will respond to neighbors “who don’t have heat, don’t have electricity, don’t know where their next meal is coming from.”

Like others who trace society’s ills to the breakdown of the home, Davis goes a step further and says “when the home began to break down, the church didn’t rally to the home by being compassionate.”

Tucked into an office crowded with sagging bookshelves and ringed by chairs, Davis relates several incidents that contribute to his conviction that compassion marks a path for Christians.

His father died when Davis was 15; his mother died a year later. He admits being angry with God, but feels that God used his pain to give him compassion. “All the clichés don’t mean a thing,” Davis said about ministering to those who are hurting. “They just need to know you care.”  

Help them struggle
He cautions parents and youth ministers not to “insulate our children” from pain because doing so “deprives them of the struggles we’ve gone through as adults. The butterfly gets its beauty and ability to fly because of its struggle to get out of the cocoon. It’s the struggle that makes us.”

Davis is a Marine veteran and a licensed electrician. He took most of his theological training through seminary extension courses that enabled him to continue working while learning. Dealing with tremendous debt from Frankie’s three heart surgeries and three operations for his son, God placed Davis in a church in Winston-Salem at just the right time to learn about and to take advantage of ministries North Carolina Baptist Hospital offers to pastors.

During his ministry he sometimes had Saturday nights of study after a 59-hour work week as an electrician when he would ask Frankie, his wife of 41 years, to wake him after a desperate 10-minute nap.

“That’s where the basis of compassion is,” Davis says, without feeling sorry for himself or asking anyone to feel sorry for him. “I know God will see you through the tough times. Nothing is too hard for Him. He’ll strengthen you when you’re down. He’ll encourage you.  I’ve lived on $5 a week and that’s to buy gas to go visiting with and everything.”

He recalls a lesson from a retired evangelist who visited prospects with him one day. When Davis declined the man’s offer of $20, “He pointed his finger in my face and said, ‘Don’t you ever refuse anything. You’re not going to cheat me out of the blessing of giving,’” Davis said.

Davis has been pastor also of Antioch Baptist Church in Winston-Salem, Fairview in Albemarle, Laurel Hill in Troy, Taylor Memorial in Gastonia and the former Rosewood Lane in Gastonia that grew from 15 to 59 in his initial pastorate, but disbanded later. He is a native of Glen Alpine, five miles west of Morganton.

He walked away from ministry in 1984, saying he “would not be abused like that again.” But God broke his heart and the day after Davis asked God to open another door to ministry, a pulpit committee called, “and the journey began all over again.”  

Special hobbies
Two special hobbies both help him to relax and expand his ministry. He uses his love of painting and of woodworking in demonstration classes open to the community.

While many pastors keep a box of tissues handy on their desks to offer a crying counselee, Davis uses a handful himself when he shares about special people in his life to whom he showed compassion.

They vary from a man with disabilities who made himself useful around the church when others pushed him aside, to a man who asked for and received Davis’ last dollar, to an 18-year-old girl who had been visiting faithfully who was killed in a car accident.

Although she was not a member, Davis’ ministered to her family while a deacon filled in for Wednesday night services.

“The people have let me pastor,” Davis says. “That has been the key. They let me do what I do best. I’ve reached into their homes, reached into their lives, and by doing that I really believe they believe I have their best interests and the best interests of the church at heart. “We’ve started an incredible journey together. It’s not my journey, it’s our journey. God is moving, don’t get in His way.”  

EDITOR’S NOTE — To recognize pastor appreciation month in October, the Biblical Recorder solicited nominations for a pastor to be featured in a story in the Recorder. Staff sifted through nominations and chose Don Davis, pastor of Dover Baptist Church for the past 12 years on the strength of the submission by Rhonda Peters. After listing many ways Davis pours himself into his congregation, Peters nominated her pastor on the basis of “his heart of love and compassion that shines forth in every facet of his ministry.” 
10/19/2010 4:13:00 AM by Norman Jameson
, BR Editor | with 1 comments



Summary of Proposed Amendments to the Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws

October 19 2010 by BSC

Following the extensive review and restructuring approved by the messengers of both the 2008 and 2009 Baptist State Convention of North Carolina (BSCNC) annual meetings, the Board of Directors (“Board”) is proposing substantially less extensive amendments for consideration by the messengers at the annual meeting for 2010. The proposed amendments brought forth by the Board involve two motions to amend the articles of incorporation and six motions to amend the bylaws. 

Motion 1 — Articles of Incorporation Article VIII. Board of Directors.

The Board proposes two changes, one of grammar and one of punctuation, to bring clarity to the first sentence of this article.  

Motion 2 — Articles of Incorporation Article XV. Amendments.

The Board proposes changes related to the notice requirement for amendments to the articles of incorporation. The proposal includes the addition of an option for proposed amendments to appear in the Biblical Recorder, the current requirement, or to be mailed to each individual cooperating church twenty-one (21) days in advance of the annual meeting. Changes in publication schedules, including deadlines for the submission of materials, have made providing notice to churches regarding proposed amendments more challenging. The proposed addition insures that cooperating churches will receive proposed amendments in written form prior to the annual meeting regardless of publication changes with the Biblical Recorder.

Motion 3 — Bylaws Article I.C.5.a.(ix) and I.C.5.c.(i). Convention Committees.


Individuals wishing to replace the name of an individual recommended by the Committee on Nominations for service to the BSCNC currently must announce their intention in the Biblical Recorder prior to the annual meeting of the convention. However, publication schedules of the Biblical Recorder have changed in recent years making it exceedingly difficult for individuals to bring such a challenge. Therefore, an amendment is proposed that will allow individuals wishing to make such a proposal to announce their intention on both the BSCNC and Biblical Recorder websites a minimum of fourteen (14) days in advance of the annual meeting of the convention.

Currently, North Carolina Baptists have the opportunity to submit resolutions for consideration by the Committee on Resolutions and Memorials up to 30 days in advance of the annual meeting of the convention. However, the deadline for the committee to announce resolutions in an edition of the Biblical Recorder for review by messengers is so close to the deadline for submission to the Committee on Memorials and Resolutions that it does not have time to fulfill its duty to review, and if necessary revise, submitted resolutions. Therefore, the proposed amendment will move the deadline for submissions of resolutions to September 10th each year. This new date will give the Memorials and Resolutions Committee time to complete its responsibilities.

Motion 4 — Bylaws Article II.E.1, Article II.F.9.c, Article II.F.9.d.(ii)(2) and (3), and Article II.F.9.d.(v). Board of Directors.

These amendments correct and make consistent capitalization, punctuation, committee names and awkward wording.

Motion 5 — Bylaws Article III.B.4. Convention Institutions and Agencies.

This amendment deletes the reference to “covered entities” and updates the name of the Budget Special Committee. Revisions to this article in 2008 removed other reference to “covered entities” which was formerly a reference to the BSCNC’s institutions and agencies. 

Motion 6 — Bylaws Article III.C.2. North Carolina Baptist Hospital.

The North Carolina Baptist Hospital (Hospital) has requested a revision of the bylaw concerning the number of trustees elected by BSCNC to serve on the Hospital’s board of trustees. Currently, the BSCNC elects one half (1/2) of the Hospital’s trustees, and that number is specified in the BSCNC Bylaws as three (3) trustees each year. The Hospital’s board is undergoing changes that will result in a smaller number of trustees serving on that board. The Hospital requests the removal of the specific number, but the retention of the provision that BSCNC will continue to elect one half (1/2) of the elected trustees serving on the Hospital’s board. This request does not impact the relationship of the Hospital to BSCNC and is not an act of severance. 

Motion 7 — Bylaws Article IV.B. and C. Convention’s Guaranty of Borrowing.

BSCNC has long established parameters related to guaranty of debt on behalf of the BSCNC’s institutions and agencies. However, with changes in relationships and the terms used to reference those relationships in recent years, clarity is needed regarding to whom these parameters apply. Therefore, to address all of the entities whether an institution, agency, auxiliary, association or church, the Board proposes changing references to “institutions and agencies” in article IV to “third party” so it will include “institutions and agencies” as well as other entities within the parameters outlined therein.

Motion 8 — Bylaws Article IV.H. Amendments.

The Board proposes changes to the notice requirements for amending the Bylaws in similar fashion to those proposed for amending the Articles of Incorporation.   
10/19/2010 4:09:00 AM by BSC | with 0 comments



Proposed amendments to Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws from the Board of Directors

October 19 2010 by BSC

Board of Directors — Articles of Incorporation  

Motion 1  

The Board of Directors moves that the first sentence of Article VIII of the Articles of Incorporation be deleted in its entirety with the following language substituted in its place.  

Current Reading:

Management of the Convention of its properties and affairs shall be vested in the members of the Convention, the Convention officers and Convention committees as well as its Board of Directors, which, in addition to its other powers and authorities, shall have the power and authority from time to time to sell, expend, or otherwise dispose of any and all property of the Convention in furtherance of any of the purposes for which the Convention has been organized   

New Reading:   

Management of the Convention and its properties and affairs shall be vested in the members of the Convention, the Convention officers and Convention committees as well as its Board of Directors, which, in addition to its other powers and authorities, shall have the power and authority from time to time to sell, expend, or otherwise dispose of any and all property of the Convention in furtherance of any of the purposes for which the Convention has been organized.   

Amendments — Articles of Incorporation
 

Motion 2
 

The Board of Directors moves that the first part of Article XV of the Articles of Incorporation prior to the clause beginning “(b) on the Convention’s website” be deleted in its entirety with the following language substituted in its place.
 

Current Reading:
 

The Articles may be changed or amended at any session during any annual meeting of the Convention other than the first or the last session during the annual meeting or during any special meeting of the Convention by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of the registered messengers present and voting when the vote is taken, provided that notice of any and all amendments to the Articles shall appear (a) in the Biblical Recorder in at least one (1) issue with a publication date of more than ten (10) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention in which the proposed action is to be taken; and (b) on the Convention’s website . . . .  

New Reading:  

The Articles may be changed or amended at any session during any annual meeting of the Convention other than the first or the last session during the annual meeting or during any special meeting of the Convention by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of the registered messengers present and voting when the vote is taken, provided that notice of any and all amendments to the Articles (a) shall either appear in the Biblical Recorder in at least one (1) issue with a publication date of more than ten (10) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention in which the proposed action is to be taken or be mailed to every cooperating church, as defined above, at least twenty-one (21) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention in which the proposed action is to be taken; and (b) shall appear on the Convention’s website . . . .

Convention Committees — Bylaws  

Motion 3  

The Board of Directors moves that (1) the first sentence in Article I.C.5.a.(ix) of the Bylaws be deleted in its entirety with the following language substituted in its place; and (2) the first three sentences in the second subparagraph (i) of Article I.C.5.c. of the Bylaws be deleted in their entirety with the following language substituted in their place.
 

(1)            Article I.C.5.a.(ix):  

Current Reading:   

(ix)            The name of any person to be nominated from the floor of the Convention and the                   name of the nominee intended to be displaced shall appear (a) in the Biblical                   Recorder in at least one (1) issue with a publication date more than one (1)                               week prior to the Convention’s annual meeting; and (b) on the Convention’s                   website beginning at least fourteen (14) days in advance of the meeting of the                   Convention and to remain on such website through the commencement of such                   meeting of the Convention.  In addition, biographical material . . .  

New Reading:   

(ix)            The name of any person to be nominated from the floor of the Convention and the                   name of the nominee intended to be displaced shall appear on the Convention’s                   website and may also be available on the Biblical Recorder website, beginning at                   least fourteen (14) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention and to                               remain on such website(s) through the commencement of such meeting of the                   Convention. In addition, biographical material . . .  

(2)            Article I.C.5.c.(i):  

Current Reading:  

(i)            All resolutions shall be submitted to the committee in writing at least thirty (30) days prior to the Convention. The committee shall consider all resolutions submitted. Those to be presented to the Convention shall appear (a) in the Biblical Recorder in at least one (1) issue with a publication date more than one (1) week prior to the Convention’s meeting; and (b) on the Convention’s website beginning at least fourteen (14) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention and to remain on such website through the commencement of such meeting of the Convention. . . .  

New Reading:
 

(i)            All resolutions shall be submitted to the committee in writing no later than September 10 prior to the annual meeting of the Convention in which the proposed resolution is to be considered. The committee shall consider all resolutions submitted. The committee shall provide notice in the Biblical Recorder in at least one (1) issue with a publication date more than fourteen (14) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention of when and where the resolution will be available on the Convention’s website and may also be available on the Biblical Recorder’s website. Those resolutions to be presented to the Convention shall appear on the Convention’s website and may also be available on the Biblical Recorder’s website, beginning at least fourteen (14) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention and to remain on such website(s) through the commencement of such meeting of the Convention. ...

Board of Directors — Bylaws  

Motion 4  

The Board of Directors moves that (1) the third sentence in Article II.E.1. of the Bylaws be deleted in its entirety with the following language substituted in its place; (2) the current first sentence of Article II.F.9.c. of the Bylaws be deleted in its entirety with the following language substituted in its place; (3) subparagraphs (2) and (3) of Article II.F.9.d.(ii) of the Bylaws be deleted in their entirety with the following language substituted in their place; and (4) the word “Committee” in the title of Article II.F.9.d.(v) of the Bylaws be deleted and the word “Subcommittee” substituted in its place.  

(1)            Article II.E.1.:   

Current Reading:   

The mid-year meeting shall be on the Tuesday and Wednesday following the third Sunday of May, or a more convenient time recommended by the Executive Director-Treasurer and Board President and voted on by the Executive Committee in its March meeting.  

New Reading:   

The mid-year meeting shall be on the Tuesday and Wednesday following the third Sunday of May, or a more convenient date recommended by the Executive Director-Treasurer and Board President and voted on by the Executive Committee in its March meeting.  

(2)            Article II.F.9.c.:  

Current Reading:
   

The Business Services Special Committee shall be responsible for counseling the Executive Leader of the Business Services Group regarding business matters, and including without limitation, procedures of bookkeeping and accounting; financial reporting; the annual audit; the convention equipment maintenance and replacement; the purchasing procedure by staff; the insurance coverage on Convention’s property; and acquiring or disposing of Convention real and personal property.  

New Reading:   

The Business Services Special Committee shall be responsible for counseling the Executive Leader of the Business Services Group regarding business matters, and including without limitation, procedures of bookkeeping and accounting; financial reporting; the annual audit; the Convention equipment maintenance and replacement; the purchasing procedure by staff; the insurance coverage on Convention’s property; and acquiring or disposing of Convention real and personal property.  

(3)            Article II.F.9.d.(ii):  

Current Reading:   

(2)            Shall continue approved appropriations until the fund reaches twenty percent                 (20%) of the Cooperative Program budget.  

(3)            Shall adhere to the following guidelines for use of these funds: to assist any                              institution or agency where a real emergency exists; to cover any unfunded                              programs due to shortfall in Cooperative Program funds where the need is urgent                  and cannot be met within other budget adjustments; and to fund any new                                   programs that are deemed to be of primary importance by the Executive                                   Committee, the Board and Executive Director-Treasurer.  

New Reading:  

(2)            Shall continue approved appropriations until the fund reaches twenty percent                 (20%) of the Cooperative Program budget;  

(3)            Shall adhere to the following guidelines for use of these funds: to assist any                              institution or agency where a real emergency exists; to cover any unfunded                              programs due to shortfall in Cooperative Program funds where the need is urgent                  and cannot be met within other budget adjustments; and to fund any new                                   programs that are deemed to be of primary importance by the Executive                                   Committee, the Board and Executive Director-Treasurer; and  

(4)            Article II.F.9.d.(v):  

Current Reading:   

Constructing and Financing Facilities Review Committee.  

New Reading:   

Constructing and Financing Facilities Review Subcommittee.  

Convention Institution and Agencies — Bylaws  

Motion 5  

The Board of Directors moves that the second, third and fourth sentences of Article III.B.4. of the Bylaws be deleted in their entirety with the following language substituted in their place.
 

Current Reading:                           

                             4.            Optional Election Method. . . .  Whenever such institution or agency exercises this option in regard to a certain percentage of its total number of trustees or directors, never more than fifty percent (50%), the Board, upon the recommendation of its Budget Committee, shall reduce the Cooperative Program funds allocated to such institution or agency by the same percentage and shall make recommendations to the Convention, through the proposed annual budget, as to how such funds may be used to accomplish other significant tasks of the Convention, its covered entities.  Any reversal of this process involving restoration of any Cooperative Program funds will be subject to budgetary limitations and must have the approval of the Budget Committee of the Board, of the Board, and of this Convention.  The trustees or directors of such institution or agency of this Convention shall make an annual report, no later than February 1 of each year, notifying the Committee on Nominations of the Convention and the Budget Committee of the Board concerning the exercising of such an option and of all vacancies to be filled. . . .  

New Reading:                           

                             4.            Optional Election Method. . . .  Whenever such institution or agency exercises this option in regard to a certain percentage of its total number of trustees or directors, never more than fifty percent (50%), the Board, upon the recommendation of its Budget Special Committee, shall reduce the Cooperative Program funds allocated to such institution or agency by the same percentage and shall make recommendations to the Convention, through the proposed annual budget, as to how such funds may be used to accomplish other significant tasks of the Convention and other entities described in this Article III.  Any reversal of this process involving restoration of any Cooperative Program funds will be subject to budgetary limitations and must have the approval of the Budget Special Committee of the Board, of the Board, and of this Convention.  The trustees or directors of such institution or agency of this Convention shall make an annual report, no later than February 1 of each year, notifying the Committee on Nominations of the Convention and the Budget Special Committee of the Board concerning the exercising of such an option and of all vacancies to be filled. . . .   

North Carolina Baptist Hospital — Bylaws  

Motion 6
 

The Board of Directors moves that Article III.C.2. of the Bylaws be deleted in its entirety with the following language substituted in its place.  

Current Reading:

             
              2.            The Convention and the Hospital shall each elect one-half (1/2) of the members of the Hospital’s board of trustees.  The Hospital shall elect three (3) trustees each year, and the Convention shall elect three (3) trustees, each for four-year (4) terms.  

New Reading:              

              2.            The Convention and the Hospital shall each elect one-half (1/2) of the elected members of the Hospital’s board of trustees.  

Convention’s Guaranty of Borrowing — Bylaws  

Motion 7  

The Board of Directors moves that (1) the phrases “an institution or agency described in Article III.B. of the Bylaws,” in Article III.B.1. and 2. of the Bylaws be deleted in their entirety and the phrases “a third party,” substituted in their places; (2) the phrase “such institution or agency” in Article III.B.2. of the Bylaws be deleted in its entirety with the phrase “such third party” substituted in its place; (3) the phrase “any of the institutions or agencies described in Article III.B.” in Article III.B.3. of the Bylaws be deleted in its entirety with the phrase “any third party” substituted in its place; and (4) the phrases “an institution or agency,” in Article III.C.1. and 2. of the Bylaws be deleted in their entirety with the phrases “a third party” substituted in their places.   

Current Reading:              

         B.            Convention’s Guaranty of Borrowing by an Institution or Agency              

                         1.            The Executive Committee may authorize the Convention to guaranty the borrowing of an institution or agency described in Article III.B. of the Bylaws, provided that (a) such borrowing . . . .                          

                         2.            The Board may authorize the Convention to guaranty the borrowing of an agency or institution described in Article III.B. of the Bylaws, provided that (a) such borrowing shall be repaid in full at the end of the subsequent fiscal year of the Convention, any unpaid balance of such borrowing at the end of the current fiscal year of the Convention shall be provided for in and made a part of the budget of such institution or agency for the Convention’s subsequent fiscal year; (b) the total amount . . .                            

                         3.            The Convention shall approve by a majority vote at its annual meeting or a special meeting any guaranty by the Convention of any borrowing by any of the institutions or agencies described in Article III.B. not specifically authorized under Paragraphs 1 or 2 above or that require the Convention to encumber any of its property.

           C.            Convention Approval of Borrowings or Guaranties                          

                         1.            Any motion which proposes the borrowing of money, the guaranty of borrowing by an institution or agency, or the encumbrance of Convention property which requires Convention approval shall set forth all pertinent facts . . . .                          

                         2.            Notice of any motion involving proposed borrowing of money, guaranty of borrowing by an institution or agency, or the encumbrance of Convention property requiring Convention approval . . . .  

New Reading:
             

         B.            Convention’s Guaranty of Borrowing by a Third Party                          

                         1.            The Executive Committee may authorize the Convention to guaranty the borrowing of a third party, provided that (a) such borrowing . . . .                          

                         2.            The Board may authorize the Convention to guaranty the borrowing of a third party, provided that (a) such borrowing shall be repaid in full at the end of the subsequent fiscal year of the Convention, any unpaid balance of such borrowing at the end of the current fiscal year of the Convention shall be provided for in and made a part of the budget of such third party for the Convention’s subsequent fiscal year; (b) the total amount ....                          
                          3.            The Convention shall approve by a majority vote at its annual meeting or a special meeting any guaranty by the Convention of any borrowing by any third party not specifically authorized under Paragraphs 1 or 2 above or that require the Convention to encumber any of its property.              

         C.            Convention Approval of Borrowings or Guaranties                          

                         1.            Any motion which proposes the borrowing of money, the guaranty of borrowing by a third party, or the encumbrance of Convention property which requires Convention approval shall set forth all pertinent facts . . . .                          
   
                         2.            Notice of any motion involving proposed borrowing of money, guaranty of borrowing by a third party, or the encumbrance of Convention property requiring Convention approval . . . .  

Amendments — Bylaws  

Motion 8  

The Board of Directors moves that the first part of Article IV.H. prior to the phrase “on the Convention’s website” near the beginning of clause (b) shall be deleted in its entirety with the following language substituted in its place.  

Current Reading:
   

These Bylaws may be changed or amended by a majority vote of the registered messengers present and voting at any session during the annual meeting (other than the first session or the last session) or during a special meeting of the Convention, provided that notice of the amendment to the Bylaws shall appear (a) in the Biblical Recorder in at least one (1) issue with a publication date of more than ten (10) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention in which the proposed action is to be taken; and (b) on the Convention’s website . . . .  

New Reading:
 

These Bylaws may be changed or amended by a majority vote of the registered messengers present and voting at any session during the annual meeting (other than the first session or the last session) or during a special meeting of the Convention, provided that notice of the amendment to the Bylaws (a) shall either appear in the Biblical Recorder in at least one (1) issue with a publication date of more than ten (10) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention in which the proposed action is to be taken or be mailed to every cooperating church, as defined in the Articles, at least twenty-one (21) days in advance of the meeting of the Convention in which the proposed action is to be taken; and (b) shall appear on the Convention’s website . . . .    
10/19/2010 3:52:00 AM by BSC | with 0 comments



Resolution Embracing The Cooperative Program

October 19 2010 by

WHEREAS, these are unprecedented times of globalization, communication, declining Western Civilization, and a great opportunity for sharing the saving grace of our Lord Jesus Christ and shining the light of the Gospel; and
WHEREAS, these times call for an unprecedented level of cooperation to accomplish the goal of bringing the Great Commission message to every people group in North Carolina, North America and the world; and
WHEREAS, the Southern Baptist Convention meeting in Orlando, June 15, 2010 voted to adopt the Great Commission Resurgence Task Force Report that refined the strategies of the convention but only after the report was amended by a nearly unanimous vote to state unequivocally that Cooperative Program giving is the preferred method for funding the Southern Baptist Convention’s ministries and that designated giving is not a substitute for Cooperative Program giving,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina meeting in annual session  in Greensboro, NC, November 8-10, 2010 acknowledges the value of concerted, cooperative ministries of our churches to reach the peoples of our state, the nation and the world; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that we are concerned that the strength and vitality of our coordinated strategies, ministries and institutions would be diminished by an independent/societal model; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that we encourage the Baptist State Convention of NC  to select leaders who have demonstrated strong support for our cooperative missions model; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that we are grateful to Rev. Milton Hollifield and his staff for their public and private advocacy toward simultaneously reaching the lost in our local areas, the state, the nation and the world through the Cooperative Program; and
BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that we embrace the Cooperative Program model as the most accountable, effective, efficient and compelling method for fulfilling the Great Commission of our Lord Jesus Christ.
10/19/2010 3:45:00 AM by | with 0 comments



Paulina’s journey leading to success

October 18 2010 by J. Blake Ragsdale, BCH

Paulina climbs into the driver’s seat of her just-purchased 1998 Jeep Cherokee. For many months, she saved money to buy her very first vehicle.

The teenager smiles as she grips the worn steering wheel. As she looks through the windshield, Paulina sees her dreams come into focus. She imagines driving herself from her cottage at Mills Home to the local restaurant where she works and then to the community college she attends.

After taking numerous turns, Paulina, 19, is on a well-paved road to success.

“I know what I want,” she says confidently. “Here at Mills Home, I am motivated to keep going.”

Paulina has lived on the Baptist Children’s Homes (BCH) campus in Thomasville since age 15. Being there has given her stability she never knew.

Paulina’s father was controlling and often abusive to her mother. Once in a fit of rage, he sent his wife tumbling down stairs when she was pregnant with Paulina. Paulina was unharmed, but the defenseless mother fell hard, breaking her nose.

After Paulina was born, her father took her to other people’s houses without informing his wife. Her mother had no way of knowing where her daughter would be or with whom. It was a way he callously controlled his family and punished Paulina’s mother.

“A dad wouldn’t do that,” Paulina says, a scowl marking her face. “He hurt my mom very badly. I don’t hold a grudge, but I know what’s real, and the reality is that he wasn’t a good person.” 

BCH photo

Paulina, 19, is thankful for the safety she found at Baptist Children’s Homes of North Carolina. She feels motivated to pursue higher goals.


Her mother filed for divorce when Paulina was three-years-old and her father was imprisoned for abuse. Her mother remarried when Paulina was seven, but the second marriage was wrought with problems and turmoil.

Life became miserable for Paulina. The couple placed Paulina at Mills Home to remove her from the environment.

Living at BCH has given Paulina the opportunity to focus on herself and to heal. 

“I needed someone to love me,” she admits.

Her houseparents, Bobby and Sonya Dalke, gave Paulina the care and comfort she needed.

“I was an angry kid and hurting. At times, I took it out on them, but they would not let me give up,” Paulina says. The Dalkes helped her deal with her emotions directing her energies into academics and sports. Paulina discovered a passion for playing soccer and running track.

“They helped me believe I could run track and make it to the regionals,” Paulina says. “But the most important thing they taught me is that I am a precious child of God.”

On Aug. 16, 2006, Paulina knelt with the Dalkes and prayed accepting Christ into her heart.

“My favorite verse is Matthew 19:26,” Paulina says, “where it says ‘with God all things are possible.’”

Paulina has seen the truth of that scripture unfold in her own life. Before, hope and happiness did not seem attainable. Today, Paulina’s goals are within reach. She participates in BCH’s transitional living program that teaches her skills she needs to be an independent adult while helping her achieve educational goals.

Paulina is so thankful for the opportunity she has received at Baptist Children’s Homes that she wants to become a social worker.

“My dream is to give back and impact the lives of others just as my life has been impacted by BCH,” Paulina reveals. “Thank you, North Carolina Baptists, for your support and prayers. You are making a difference.”

(EDITOR’S NOTE — Ragsdale is director of communications for Baptist Children’s Homes of N.C.)
10/18/2010 10:03:00 AM by J. Blake Ragsdale, BCH | with 0 comments



Campbell dean appreciates church commitment

October 18 2010 by Norman Jameson
, BR Editor

Campbell University Divinity School’s new dean appreciates the school’s balance of scholarship with its desire to serve the church practically.

Andy Wakefield was named dean in July, succeeding Michael Cogdill who returned to the classroom after helping to get the divinity school started 15 years ago. Wakefield, who found his trail to teaching through a forest of other possibilities, will continue to teach at least one class while adding administrative duties because he is “passionate” about teaching.

He also is enthusiastic about living and working in the Campbell community because Campbell values his scholarship and love of teaching and enthusiastically endorses his “love for the church and a desire to serve the church.”

“I want to be able to serve a church and that not be seen as a distraction from my job,” Wakefield said during an interview in his office. “My church involvement is seen as an asset rather than a detriment.”  

Sorting
As a young student sorting out possibilities for life, Wakefield, 50, never pictured himself as a dean, or even as a professor because he never saw someone in front of the classroom that he wanted to be, he said.

He worked three years in the blossoming world of micro computers before he went to seminary, trying to discern exactly what God was leading him toward.

On his first day in seminary, he met a missionary kid on her birthday. Because Olivia was just off the field, her birthday was included on the Woman’s Missionary Union missionary prayer calendar. He told her, “With millions of people praying for you today, and you meet me, that can’t be a coincidence!”

He found a love for preaching while at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. “I remember thinking to myself what would really be wonderful — the ideal, if I had my wishes — would be to somehow put these together, where I could teach and also serve the churches. I didn’t realize until much later that was describing what I have a Campbell.”

Wakefield earned his doctorate at Duke University Divinity School and was teaching Greek and New Testament adjunctively at Campbell when he was asked to join the faculty of the new divinity school. Campbell’s divinity school found early success, even as a new school in the midst of much more established seminaries.

BR photo by Norman Jameson

Andy Wakefield wasn’t a basketball fan when he came to North Carolina, but he appreciated the University of North Carolina’s coach being on the faculty. He thought “Dean” Smith was a title.


“Each of us is offering something slightly different and I think that’s valuable,” Wakefield said. For instance, he felt lost among Southern’s more than 2,000 students. Community is easier to find among Campbell Divinity’s 220.

“We have very powerfully been able to model the body of Christ,” Wakefield said. “Students really plug into this where they experience a sense of community, of acceptance. And it’s not based on all having the exact same views. We have students coming from a wide variety of backgrounds. Twenty-five percent of the student body is not Baptist; the other 75 percent is different flavors. They are different ages, post-college to their 70s, and ethnically diverse.” They are all committed to the school’s ministry statement which is:  Christ centered, Bible based and ministry focused.

That statement is more than a slogan, Wakefield said. It gives students latitude to hold different perspectives. They “may not be on the same page” in some things, but they’re in the same book and a part of the same body of Christ.

“Our students then want to take this model of being the body of Christ out to the churches and say, ‘OK, how can we as a church embrace one another with our differences?’”

Wakefield recognizes that Campbell Divinity and Gardner-Webb Divinity were born from turmoil in the Southern Baptist Convention, whose six seminaries have been the primary preparatory schools for Baptist church staff. And although the five universities affiliated with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina (BSC) are changing their relationship to the BSC, “Campbell still views itself as partners with the Baptist State Convention and we value that partnership because this is who we’re serving,” he said.

He said Campbell Divinity graduates “for the most part” find open doors for service and “find themselves well equipped for ministry.”

“We are rigorously academic but we are also rigorously practical and we don’t think those two can’t go hand in hand,” he said.

Most students are in the master of divinity program, but Campbell Divinity also offers master in Christian education, a doctor of ministry degree and several certificate programs, including Hispanic theological education, childhood ministry and women in leadership.

Wakefield is a missionary kid himself, having grown up in the Philippines and Singapore, although he graduated from high school in Richmond, Va., when his father, Bill, became an administrator with the International Mission Board. He graduated in philosophy from Wake Forest University and Southern Seminary and earned his PhD at Duke Divinity.

He and Olivia have been married 23 years and have two daughters: Natalie and Allison.

His doctoral thesis and continuing interest is on the Apostle Paul’s use of scripture in his writing and on Paul’s view of the law.  

Manual hobbies
Maybe unusual for an academic, but Wakefield’s hobbies are very manual — metal working and wood working. He says it’s logical to have those interests because “I’m interested in everything and would like to know a little something about everything.”

He is a part of Baptist Fellowship of Angier, a four-year-old non-traditional church that focuses on ministry to young people. Campbell University and Divinity School students are involved in tutoring Hispanic, black and Anglo children. The church shares an old funeral home with an Hispanic congregation.

“The thing that keeps blowing me away is that we are literally a handful of people and we have made it our focus to basically pour everything we have and do into ministry,” Wakefield said.

Although Campbell Divinity trains students primarily for service in traditional churches, “the church is evolving and we want our students to connect to that and be at the forefront of leading the church to wherever God takes them,” Wakefield said.

He says the Southern Baptist Convention is “at the forefront” of that church evolution. It is struggling through inevitable change, and no one knows what it is going to become.

Wakefield has “a very high view of scripture” he said. But he has “a very low view of someone who wants to tell me what scripture says. I’m committed to scripture. That means I have to read it; I have to wrestle with it; I have to explore it as honestly as I know how.”

“What I passionately want is that students have thought it through and they have their own grasp on it,” he said. “It is real close to blasphemy not to force yourself to treat all of scripture as honestly, as responsibly and as consistently as you know how.”

All the Divinity School’s faculty are Baptist and Wakefield says the school is intentional about its identity as Baptist.

“Within that, we embrace diversity,” he said.
10/18/2010 9:57:00 AM by Norman Jameson
, BR Editor | with 0 comments



Resolution of Appreciation to Host City

October 18 2010 by BSC

Whereas, the 180th annual session of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina is meeting November 8-10, 2010 in Greensboro, North Carolina; and

Whereas, the local citizens involved in welcoming and facilitating our sessions have done so in a very caring and effective manner;           

Whereas, the management and staff of the Koury Center, Sheraton Hotel, have gone the extra mile to accommodate this Convention;

Therefore, be it resolved that we, the messengers to the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, meeting at the Koury Center, Sheraton Hotel in Greensboro, November 8-10, 2010, express our appreciation to the people of Greensboro, the management and staff of the Koury Center, Sheraton Hotel and to the Committee on Convention Meetings for outstanding service and kindness rendered to us during this annual meeting.
10/18/2010 9:56:00 AM by BSC | with 0 comments



Committee proposes change to annual meeting

October 18 2010 by BSC

The 2010 Committee on Convention Meetings will be recommending to the messengers of the upcoming 180th annual meeting of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, scheduled for Nov. 8-10, 2010, a change in the proposed schedule for the 181st annual meeting, to occur in November 2011.

The recommendation will be as follows:

The Committee on Convention Meetings moves that the annual meeting for 2011 move to a two day meeting. The proposed dates for the convention meeting are November 7 and 8.

A move to a two-day meeting is beneficial to both those planning the annual meeting and those attending the annual meeting.

The greatest financial savings will come to those who attend the annual meeting, specifically messengers, as a shorter convention will allow many messengers to return home rather than spending an additional evening in the hotel and the additional expenses associated with the third day of a convention meeting. 

Through a review of attendance on the third day of the annual meeting over the last decade, it is obvious that fewer and fewer messengers are attending a third day.

Many North Carolina Baptists may not realize that our convention is only one of a handful that continues to hold three-day meetings of the convention.

However, it is also important to note that in spite of the length of the meeting, North Carolina continues to have the largest attended annual meeting of state conventions across the Southern Baptist Convention.

The Committee will bring this motion during the Monday evening session of the upcoming annual meeting.

Messengers will determine whether this proposal moves forward at that time.

Only messengers who have registered prior to the beginning of the Monday evening session will be able to participate in this discussion.

We hope that you will attend the convention Monday evening, participate in this discussion, and celebrate what our Lord has accomplished through our Convention this year.  
10/18/2010 9:54:00 AM by BSC | with 0 comments



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