Is there room for God?
    September 10 2012 by K. Allan Blume, BR Editor

    We often lament that our world is too busy. Whether it is intentional or unintentional, our fast-paced lifestyles frequently push God aside or completely shut Him out of our lives. We are too busy for a quiet time, too busy to read the Bible, too busy to pray or too busy to go to church. Of those who do take the time to go to church, most will only attend one service on Sunday morning.
     
    It begs the question, “Is there room for God in our lives?” Whether this is due to busy schedules or personal choices, are we refusing to give God the place He deserves?
     
    It is easy to let other things crowd our lifestyles to the extent that we unintentionally have no room for God. It also exposes our priorities.
     
    Some are more intentional about excluding God from their lives. Such is the case with atheists and secularists. They choose to deny God in every way: His existence, His role in creation, His place in education, and His function in government.
     
    Apparently their influence is strong in the Democratic Party. The September 5 fiasco on the floor of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Charlotte exposed someone’s agenda. The absence of any reference to God in the DNC’s platform caused quite a stir.
     
    It was reported that President Obama asked the leadership to restore the single reference to God.

    After three voice votes on the convention floor, the delegates’ opinion was still uncertain. The chair ruled that the motion to insert God in the platform passed, inciting strong vocal opposition from the floor.
     
    Is there room for God in the Democratic Party’s platform? If He is given a slight mention, His principles are ignored in some party positions. The DNC has stood against biblical values of life for decades.
     
    This year they chose to go on record as the first major political party in the United States to call for the legalization of same-sex marriage.
     
    Some question whether political parties should be concerned about including or excluding God in policies and platforms. They embrace the secular worldview that advocates the removal of every trace of God’s reality from all that relates to government.
     
    There are at least two problems with this position. First, God establishes governments. Orderly government is not the invention of man. It is God’s design. It is foolish to exclude Him from his own creation. The Bible says, “For there is no authority except from God, and the authorities that exist are appointed by God” (Romans 13:1b, NKJ).
     
    Second, God is sovereign over everything. He is not limited to activity only in the world of “religion.” His sovereign presence will be acknowledged by all who know Him and worship Him. In fact, that acknowledgment is inseparable from true worship.
     
    The secularist ignores this basic tenant of both Judaism and Christianity. To those with a Christian worldview, it is a foundational conviction that God belongs in all areas of life.
     
    Isaiah declared, “O LORD Almighty, God of Israel, enthroned between the cherubim, you alone are God over all the kingdoms of the earth. You have made heaven and earth” (Isaiah 37:16, NIV).
     
    The founding fathers of the United States did not believe in the separation of God from government. Their writings demonstrate their strong conviction that this nation was founded by God, protected by God, preserved by God, blessed by God and therefore must be dependent on God. They made room for God without apology.
     
    Paul emphasized, “...that in all things He may have the preeminence” (Colossians 1:18, NKJ).
     
    “Preeminence” also translates “first place” or “supremacy.” Not only does God – and His Son – deserve mention in every portion of life, He should be given first place.
     
    Is there room for God in the United States? More important, are His followers making room for Him every minute of every day?
    9/10/2012 1:38:51 PM by K. Allan Blume, BR Editor | with 0 comments




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