A call to maturity
January 25 2002 by Can you recall growing up as teenagers trying to sing along with the songs coming over the car radio? Of course, our rendition of each song, at times, had much to be desired. Somehow, though, all of us knew in the back of our minds that if we could m

A call to maturity | Friday, Jan. 25, 2002

Friday, Jan. 25, 2002

A call to maturity

1 Corinthians 2:1-16 Can you recall growing up as teenagers trying to sing along with the songs coming over the car radio? Of course, our rendition of each song, at times, had much to be desired. Somehow, though, all of us knew in the back of our minds that if we could master each tune we would be so much more "mature" around our peers.

A song I remember that helped me age in other ways was a popular tune, "Cat's in the Cradle" by Harry Chapin. Chapin relates in the verse how a relationship develops over the years between a father and his son. He sings at the end of the song that all the father's bad habits had now been passed down to his son. Now, too late to change, the father laments, "He'd grown up just like me. My boy was just like me."

The significance of who we model our lives after is critical for not only our personal day-to-day existence, but also, more importantly, for our spiritual well being. Paul knew this to be accurate for the young believers at Corinth. The examples they follow would dictate their maturity as a Christian.

The Messenger

(1 Corinthians 2:1-5)

If anyone had a life-changing experience with God, it was Paul. From his Damascus Road salvation to his successful itinerant preacher stops, he could easily have claimed greatness in the early church movement. Yet we see him sharing in these verses his Christian maturity by way of his humility. He directs them to Christ and not to himself.

A sincere act of growing up in the faith for us today is to be arrows pointing others to Jesus.

We also see the human side of the apostle. Even the great Paul in verse three shared with them that he struggled as a called out one for the Lord. His strength rested not on his ability but on his dependency on God. His main concern was to have them understand that faith is not based on anything human, but on God's power.

The Message

(1 Corinthians 2:6-16)

Paul sets out sharing his message of what is true maturity. In verse seven we are reminded that true wisdom was around before time began. God was the author. Anything else made by man falls severely short of the goal.

Going further to prove his point in verse nine, Paul states that this wisdom is reserved for those of us who are believers. It is always amazing to hear many new believers share one of their first insights as a Christian as finally understanding the meaning of the Gospel story. This dose of true wisdom brings so much joy to their lives.

In verses 10-12 we discover that this wisdom is revealed and interpreted through the Holy Spirit. The benefit of having the Spirit is to enable us to understand our gifts that we use for God's glory. Not only do we have the reassurance of the Trinity with us, but also we are now blessed with talents to share with others. Christian maturity is not complete until we give ourselves away.

Another characteristic of this message is found in verses 14-15. Divine wisdom given to believers will provide right judgments. The ability to discern between what can be done and what should be done is something people have craved throughout the ages. As followers of Christ we now have that portion at our disposal.

More than anything else, Paul is trying to convince the Corinthians in verse 16 that they can measure maturity when they approach life like Christ. Do they see the world through Christ's eyes or their own?

And what about us today? From our viewpoint are we being diverted to something or someone else besides Christ? Can you and I say that we are trying to grow up just like Him?

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1/25/2002 12:00:00 AM by Can you recall growing up as teenagers trying to sing along with the songs coming over the car radio? Of course, our rendition of each song, at times, had much to be desired. Somehow, though, all of us knew in the back of our minds that if we could m | with 0 comments
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