March 2011

Formations Lesson for April 17: Rejoicing in Suffering

March 31 2011 by Wayne Proctor, pastor, Eure Baptist Church

Focal Passage: Colossians 1:24-29

Persecution of Christians 2010: On Dec. 12, seven house churches were forcibly closed by Muslim extremists in West Java, Indonesia. On Dec. 3 a Pakistani mullah offered more than $6,000 (US) to anyone who kills Asia Bibi, who was previously sentenced to death by a Pakistani judge on Nov. 8. Her crime — telling Muslim women about Jesus. On Oct. 31 in Baghdad, 59 Christians were killed when Islamic radicals attacked worshippers at the Syrian Orthodox Church (source: persecution.com). 

It is common knowledge that persecution of Christians in North Africa, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia is occurring at alarming, record levels.

As Baptists, we are not allowed to know the name or location of hundreds of our missionaries.   Furthermore, much of the abuse and persecution goes unreported.

It seems we have gone back in time to the days of Paul and Silas where suffering for Christ was not optional — it came with the job.

Paul makes a number of salient points in this text.  

First, he found joy in suffering for Christ.

Not that pain was fun, but there was a pleasure he received knowing that he was pleasing Christ.

In a real way, his pain was a continuation of the suffering Christ Himself had endured (v. 24).

Christ had instituted the church, and Paul reveled in the privilege of being a church leader. Second, Paul rejoiced in the proclamation of what he called “the mystery.”

What was this mystery?

It was the revelation of the gospel to the Gentiles, and their reception of that glorious gift. Paul called the Christian experience, “Christ in you, the hope of glory (v. 27b).”

Third, there was the goal of spiritual maturity.

Colossae was unfortunately infected with a brand of Greek gnosticism and Jewish extremism.

Dangerous heresies abounded.

Paul was constantly “warning” the new, vulnerable Gentile believers to avoid all corruptive influences.

Yet, to use an analogy from sports, you don’t win by just playing defense. In fact, the best defense is a good (great) offense.

Paul’s tact was to work extra hard (relying upon Christ’s strength in him) teaching the people the foundations of the Christian life.

It was no coincidence that he spoke of making God’s message “fully” known to them (v. 25b).

There is a great need for quality Bible teachers in today’s church.

We have an amazing number of resources at our disposal.

We just need to take the time and make the commitment to learn, to study.

Of all the books we might read, the Bible needs to garner our time and affection.

And for those who are teachers, teach it with passion, compassion, and love.

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.) 
3/31/2011 4:54:00 AM by Wayne Proctor, pastor, Eure Baptist Church | with 0 comments



Bible Studies for Life Lesson for April 17: Receive Comfort — Give Comfort

March 31 2011 by Jim Grieme, pastor, Watkins Chapel Baptist Church

Focal Passage: 2 Corinthians 1:1-11

In 2 Corinthians 1:1-11, the overwhelming idea communicated is this: not everything is about us.

In other words, it is not all about me. God, being the “God of all comfort,” grants us comfort so we might be able to comfort others. 

Paul intimates the sufferings we face are but an “overflow” of the suffering Christ Himself faced.  

Paul is instructing those of us to view our sufferings as an opportunity to minister to those who are suffering.

At first glance we might be tempted to say, “You’re kidding, right?”

For many of us, just surviving whatever is afflicting us is tough enough!

Now Paul wants us to view this as a “study hall prep class?”

I grew up in Illinois. Because of this, I have experienced many tornadoes in the middle of the night when our parents would wake us up and either carry us or drive us to a storm shelter.

One of the things I distinctly remember is that my dad always placed himself between the opening in the storm shelter and the rest of us. I knew even then how destructive tornadoes were, but my dad was communicating to us they would go through him first. We might get wet, or blown on, but we would only get whatever overflowed off of my dad. Is what Paul is communicating difficult? Yes, it is unbelievably difficult. Is it possible to survive such ordeals?

Only through a relationship with Jesus Christ.

Paul said Christ stood in the way of all of the affliction and suffering first: “as the sufferings of Christ overflow to us.”

Where is Jesus when a parent or child dies? Where is he when our spouse is told they have inoperable cancer? Where is Christ when madmen fly a plane into a building trapping hundreds of people?

He is there, accepting the full-blow of the pain and only allowing us to receive, according to Paul in 1 Corinthians 10:13 says, “(God) is faithful, and He will not allow (us) to be tempted beyond what (we) are able.”

If everything Jesus did during His earthly ministry was done for the glory of God, should we not remind ourselves that everything in an obedient believer’s life accomplishes the same thing? Let us remind ourselves of the grace given to us, so in turn, we may give it to others. Since every experience we have is custom made for our lives, those same experiences enable us to minister to others for God’s glory.

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.) 
3/31/2011 4:45:00 AM by Jim Grieme, pastor, Watkins Chapel Baptist Church | with 0 comments



Formations Lesson for April 10: Reconciled Through Christ’s Death

March 28 2011 by Wayne Proctor, pastor, Eure Baptist Church

Focal Passage: Colossians 1:21-23

One of the joys of ministry is meeting people who live long, productive lives.  

I once knew a woman who was 105. I also knew a couple who had been married more than 75 years. They had married at about age 20 and lived past age 95.  

They were “happily” married, yet I’m sure they would agree that even their marriage wasn’t perfect. They had 5 children — children tend to have their own kind of problems. They, like all the rest of us, had times where they had disagreements and needed to “make up.”  

The Bible has a beautiful word for this “making up.”  

It is “reconciliation.” We all make mistakes. We all have a condition I refer to as “meitis (me-I-tis).” It can be terminal.  

When Paul wrote to the Colossian Christians, he had one goal in mind for them — that they might be “right” before God. He knew they had been pagans. They had thought like pagans and they had lived like pagans (v. 21). It was the life they knew best. But after becoming Christians, they realized God had a higher standard for their thinking and their believing and their living. Their new standard was Christ. Paul also made it clear that although they had Christ’s teachings and power available to them, living this Christian life was not going to be easy.  

Their faith could be shaken. They could stray. They had to commit to this life and not be deterred by the voices and will of others (v. 23).  

In verse 22 we have three beautiful words to describe this goal of being “right with God.” None of us is capable of attaining these words. What are they? Holy, faultless (irreproachable), and blameless. These are words to describe God, not you and me. Yet, these words are the fruit of reconciliation. Holy, set apart, without fault or blame, forgiven, recipients of grace.  

How is this possible?  

The answer is found in verses 20-21. Christ has reconciled “you” to God by the giving of His body, by the shedding of His blood on the cross.  

Further, that one act of amazing love has paved the way for the Christian to have “peace” with God, both in the earthly life and in the life to come. God’s wants honesty from us. Strange as it may seem, I’ve met men who “remarkably” claimed to have never, ever had a disagreement or ill word with their wife. I worry about people who make such claims. Hopefully, we’re more honest with God.  

Hopefully we recognize we’re only “right” and “righteous” when we admit we’re sinners saved by grace.

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
3/28/2011 9:26:00 AM by Wayne Proctor, pastor, Eure Baptist Church | with 0 comments



Bible Studies for Life Lesson for April 10: Recognize God’s Presence

March 28 2011 by Jim Grieme, pastor, Watkins Chapel Baptist Church

Focal Passages: Psalm 31:7-10, 14-16, 21-24

In Psalm 31:1-24, David is certainly “up the creek minus a paddle.”

He acknowledges God and His power, His protection and His liberating presence, but his situation in verses 6-13, is the point when the “white flags” would go up for most people. Very few of us have had people plotting to take our lives (v. 13).

Throughout the Psalms we read over and again the difficulties David faced in his life. Here in this psalm, David admits his distress (v. 9) and acknowledges his grief (v. 9). He feels so alone he is “like a dead person” (v. 12).

Yet beginning in v. 14, we see a noticeable shift in his attitude? How does he pull this off?

By the time I would finish a verse 13 moment in my life, I would have already thrown a party for my three favorite people: me, myself and I!

Of course there would be no keg (I am a Baptist preacher-dude) and the dancing would be limited, but man oh man, the three of us would be downing great big bottles of pity — self-pity to be exact.

And unlike fine wine, self-pity is great straight off the circumstantial vine. David is able to see his circumstances because of his relationship with the Lord. Far too often we allow the circumstances of our lives to “pile up” between ourselves and Christ.

We overlook the fact that the Lord knows we are made of little more than dust. In the midst of our sufferings, we frequently forget God’s faithfulness in our lives — especially in our difficulties — and as Paul writes in 1 Corinthians 10:13, He will not allow us to be tempted beyond our abilities, but in the midst of the temptation and trial, “He will also provide a way of escape.”

He knows our tolerances, He understands what we can and cannot take, and He will always give us options.

David understood this very well.

Unfortunately, when I find myself stressed, I forget too much of what I know — and should know!

I have read that in a stressful situation, many people can forget up to 40 percent of what they know.

The solution? To over prepare.

Since I have been married, I have experienced a lot of stress (but this has nothing to do with my wife).

In the midst of the stress I have never been tempted to forget I was married.

Why haven’t I forgotten? It is because of my great relationship with my wife. That and my relationship with Christ serve to define who I am.

So, are we defining ourselves by our circumstances or by Christ?

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
3/28/2011 9:18:00 AM by Jim Grieme, pastor, Watkins Chapel Baptist Church | with 0 comments



Formations Lesson for April 3: Rescued from Darkness

March 17 2011 by Wayne Proctor, pastor, Eure Baptist Church

Focal Passage: Colossians 1:9-14

I once had the experience of going “caving.” Some call it spelunking. Some also call it “fun.” I didn’t.

For a few hours that day my wife and I spent time underground with nothing but a hard hat and a flashlight. I’m a fairly thin guy, so navigating through the cracks and crevices of the rock was not overly difficult. At least I didn’t get stuck.

But I did notice that if I strayed from some of the group, and cut my flashlight off, it was complete darkness. Not the darkness one experiences at 10 p.m. outdoors, but “absolute” darkness.

I once heard that darkness is best defined as the “absence of light.”

And that is true not only for caving 20 feet underground, but being in spiritual darkness. The key verses for us are 13-14. These are verses that describe salvation.

All of us lived at one time in the domain or dominion of darkness, and there we would have remained except for the amazing gift of God, Jesus Christ, in “whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.”

In this passage, and elsewhere in the New Testament, we have a comparison of light and darkness.

Jesus is the “light of the world.” Apart from Him, we live in spiritual darkness. We cannot know God unless we come to know Jesus, the Son. 

The context of the passage, verses 9-14, is a prayer for spiritual growth.

A pastor by the name of Epaphras (v. 7) had guided the church most recently. His testimony was that the Colossians excelled in their “love” for others (v. 8).

But they, like us, needed continual prayer and Paul had been consistent in his prayer for them. Paul identified three major focuses of those prayers:
  1. that they might be filled with the knowledge of God’s will for their lives,
  2. that they might walk worthy of being Christ’s followers, bearing spiritual fruit,
  3. and that they might be strengthened with God’s power, a strength that endures and perseveres with joy. 
This is a beautiful passage. It describes the life of grace.

It also describes a life filled with light where the presence of spiritual darkness and gloom has disappeared for good. That is the world Christians will know one day. It is also the world we can experience in limited degree at present.

But let us not fool ourselves. Satan is still alive, and we have to be on guard every day in our battle against him. We are not so strong. We cannot win this battle without Christ. He is our conquering hero. 

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.) 
3/17/2011 3:28:00 AM by Wayne Proctor, pastor, Eure Baptist Church | with 0 comments



Bible Studies for Life Lesson for April 3: Balance Grief with Hope

March 17 2011 by Jim Grieme, pastor, Watkins Chapel Baptist Church

Focal Passage: John 11:1-44

Grief all too easily blinds us. Jesus in John 11:1-44 addresses those “blinded” by grief. In this passage we see various expressions of grief. Martha exhibits an intellectual grief.

This grief accepts the inevitability and universality of death, yet shuns any overtly emotional expression of it.

This is the grief espoused by our culture today. Mary displays emotion, but she chooses to make Jesus its focus; her grief is real and demonstrative, yet she determines with whom she will share it. Those Jews who came to console and mourn with the family expressed an extroverted emotion; an out-of-control, indiscriminate grief which often makes others feel uncomfortable.

Let’s review the major events of this story. On learning of Lazarus’ sickness, Jesus announces Lazarus’ illness will not bring death but glory to the Father and Son (v. 4). He then states they are returning to Judea, which elicits concern over His well-being by His disciples.

Jesus replies there is no stumbling when one “sees the light of this world” — a clear reminder to His teaching that He is “the Light of the world” (John 9:5).

After leading His disciples to the proverbial water, Thomas in v. 16 thinks they are going with Him to die; demonstrating their lack of understanding of His words in v. 8.

Our human tendency is to focus on the people in the story rather than who Christ is.

Face it; all of us are “people.” We live with people, and since we are people, we think like them. Grief is not evil or wrong.

Grief is the natural by-product of having someone’s presence ripped from our lives. Besides the amazing consolation available to us through a relationship with the Father through the Son, God also grants us the gift of memory. And “memories,” someone once wrote, “are like fresh cut roses in winter-time.”

Jesus is not angered over expressed grief.

He is not weeping over the death of a friend. 

He is angered by grief powered by fear and devoid of hope.

He weeps because even though He is present, those with Him still do not grasp His mission, His purpose. Fear, as He later teaches in John 14, is incompatible with the peace He brings. 

Our protection against overwhelming grief is a deep, abiding relationship with the One who is resurrection and life. We, unlike Christ’s disciples, need to remember that we cannot stumble when walking “during the day” (v. 9).

Let’s strive to put the “Light of the World” in the center of our lives. 

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.) 
3/17/2011 3:22:00 AM by Jim Grieme, pastor, Watkins Chapel Baptist Church | with 0 comments



Formations Lesson for March 27: The Servant of All

March 16 2011 by John Pond, associational missionary, West Chowan Baptist Association

Focal Passage: Matthew 20:20-28

As I am writing this, we are in the midst of the Thanksgiving/Christmas holidays. With this season comes a flood of commercials aimed at enticing us to assert our self-esteem and self-fulfillment by purchasing their “unique” products. One particular commercial came on the other evening. A wife had worked hard and saved to purchase her husband a new car.

With a pretty bow on it the grateful husband is almost in tears with joy, gratitude and pride for this sacrificial gift on the part of his wife, until … a rival manufacturer’s car drives by and the present suddenly becomes meaningless and hollow.

The implication is that his wife’s gift is just not good enough, regardless of its newness or efficiency. Today’s text deals with the attitude that wants more at any cost.

A mother comes to Jesus asking for the promotion of her sons; promotion to the right and left side of the Messiah in His kingdom.

Can they do what must be done; suffer whatever must be suffered, etc? “Of course,” they respond. And they will, but, positions are given by the Father, not the Son. Then, the others hear the discussion, and they are resentfully indignant.

It has been observed by one writer that “Today the first and greatest commandment is ‘Thou shalt love thyself.’” Any problem, any personal difficulty or relational disagreement comes not from sin, but low self-esteem or the prevention of affirming one’s self-esteem. Marriages dissolve because one of the partners feels squelched or restricted by the other. Sadly, this is not a recent development.

Augustine writes in his City of God: “Two cities have been formed by two loves: the earthly by the love of self, even to the contempt of God; the heavenly by the love of God, even to the contempt of self. The former, in a word, glories in itself. The latter in the Lord.”

A very troubling movement in today’s church has been the promotion of the minister as sole authority and ruler of the congregation.

Many churches have suffered because its pastor stands as lord and leader.

Rather than model the Lord’s ministry in terms of servanthood and pastoral shepherd, this minister redefines ministry as authoritarian (his sole authority) and vengeful (the Word becomes a savage blade against any who oppose).

Yet, hear Jesus’ response to His disciples’ indignation towards the sons of Zebedee: “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles Lord it over them, and their great ones exercise authority over them. It shall not be so among you! (emphasis mine). Whoever would be great among you must be your servant, and whoever would be first among you must be your slave” (20:25-27).

Oh that we would hear the word of the Lord! 

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
3/16/2011 3:31:00 AM by John Pond, associational missionary, West Chowan Baptist Association | with 0 comments



Bible Studies for Life Lesson for March 27: Stay the Course

March 16 2011 by Joel Stephens, pastor, Westfield Baptist Church

Focal Passages: 1 Peter 4:1-2, 7-19

His name is Shoaib Assadullah. Shoaib is a Muslim convert to Christianity who lives in Afghanistan where leaving the Muslim faith is a capital offense.

According to Voice of the Martyrs, Shoaib was arrested on Oct. 21, 2010, for giving another man a Bible (see story at www.persecution.com).

The judge told Shoaib on Jan. 3 that he had one week to renounce Christ, or he would face up to 20 years in prison, and possibly even death.

Shoaib’s choice is not uncommon in the history of Christian persecution:
  • deny Christ and he will be set free;
  • refuse and he could lose his life.
He worries about what the authorities will do to his family, and he prays that he can remain strong in his faith.

He recently told Voice of the Martyrs contacts in Afghanistan: “Please pray that I can stand well. I am not afraid of death.”

Estimates declare that over 170,000 Christians are martyred for their faith every year. These are our brothers and our sisters in Christ. By the time you finish reading this article someone will be arrested and will face the death penalty because of their Christian faith.

Has God abandoned them? Of course not!

He is glorified through their perseverance in the midst of suffering.

Persecution is not punishment, it is an indication that we are living as Christ would have us to live. “All who desire to live godly in Christ Jesus will suffer persecution” (2 Tim. 3:12, NKJV).

Why do they suffer while we in America continue unharmed?

Perhaps the answer is found in another question: When was the last time we shared our faith publicly with a lost person as Shoaib did?

After all, why should the evil one bother us if our spiritual mediocrity poses no threat to his dominion?

Pray for our brothers and sisters who are being persecuted right now.

Pray for our nation, that we might remain free to worship as the Bible teaches.

Pray for one another, that when persecution does come, that we will stand strong.

Oh sovereign Lord, grant that we may live lives that glorify You and ravage the enemy. And when his fiery darts are hurled our way, may we stand strong in Your strength. May every breath including our last valiantly declare that You alone are our King! 

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)  
3/16/2011 3:28:00 AM by Joel Stephens, pastor, Westfield Baptist Church | with 0 comments



Formations Lesson for March 20: The Greatest in the Kingdom

March 7 2011 by John Pond, associational missionary, West Chowan Baptist Association

Focal Passage: Matthew 18:1-7

They were going the wrong way. The disciples had followed Him from the early days to this present moment.

And now, most likely in Peter’s home with his family around them, they are concerned with positions of greatness. Previously, Jesus had affirmed Peter’s confession and even included him personally in paying the temple tax. Maybe the others were not as agreeable to this apparent turn of events, thus they needed to know “Who is the greatest in the Kingdom of heaven?” (18:1).

Ignoring the call to self-denial and cross-bearing, they needed affirmation about their self-defined way.

They truly were going the wrong way.

So Jesus called a young toddler (probably Peter’s young child or a relative of his) and lovingly placed the child in their midst — “Except you turn (You’re heading in the wrong direction with your selfish ambition) and become like children, you otherwise not get into the kingdom of heaven at all, let alone have big places in it!” (A.T. Robertson). F.F. Bruce has suggested that Jesus’ “tone at this time is markedly severe, as much as when He denounces the Pharisaism in the bud He had to deal with.” Pointing to the little child by His side Jesus stuns the disciples with the reality that true greatness comes from humbling oneself; i.e., to literally make oneself low. This statement is a powerful blow to any who would exalt themselves to the point of imagining that God would be pleased with them for their individual goodness. Bruce writes that to humble oneself is “the most difficult thing in the world for saint or for sinner.”

Further, not only must one humble his or herself, but they must be humble enough to receive others as children. Later the Apostle Paul will make much of how we must regard that individual who may be the weaker brother or sister.

He will stress in his letters and actions how we should treat not only those within the community of faith, but also those outside that are truly the weaker one (cf. Acts 17:16ff; 1 Cor. 11; Rom. 13, etc.). We must not be a stumbling stone to anyone.

The story is told of a man who was an alcoholic. One cold winter evening he snuck out of the house to go to the local pub for drinks with his buddies. He had not walked too far when he suddenly heard the soft crunching sound in the deep snow behind him. When he turned around he saw his five-year old son a few yards behind him. When he asked his son what he was doing, the small child replied, “I’m trying to walk in your footsteps, Daddy.” With those words this dad turned around and never drank again. 

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
3/7/2011 3:56:00 AM by John Pond, associational missionary, West Chowan Baptist Association | with 0 comments



Bible Studies for Life Lesson for March 20: Relationships Under Stress

March 7 2011 by Joel Stephens, pastor, Westfield Baptist Church

Focal Passages: 1 Peter 2:11-12; 3:1-12

When two boats pull alongside each other, the boatmen lash the two crafts together. Without the lashings, these two boats would passively drift apart even in the calmest of water.

And when a storm arises and the waves mount up, without the lashings holding the vessels together as one, they would smash each other to bits.

The more tumultuous the storm, the more vehemently the boats are pulled apart and pushed together by the raging sea.

Together they can aid one another and steady one another. Separated they can sink one another.

Boats, like individuals, have their own mission and their own captain overseeing the mission.

For the most part, boats are self-sufficient; they have to be so to survive long voyages.

But every now and then, it becomes necessary for two boats to mutually agree to be tied together for a time in order to be mutually benefited.

That’s what a relationship is: two individuals who choose to tie themselves together in a friendship, a marriage, or a workplace.

And just like on the ocean, storms will come on the sea of life; there’s no getting around that.

Marriages will be rocked by financial difficulties. Friendships will be strained by over-packed schedules or competition from other social connections. Workplaces can be poisoned by distrust and devaluing one another.

Stress is a reality in this fallen world. Are your relationships sufficiently lashed together in order to withstand the storm?

Love, mutual accountability, unselfishness, integrity, and fellowship all serve to tie relationships together in the midst of life’s storms. And the lashing — the tying together of these two lives must be sufficiently completed prior to the arrival of the storm if the relationship is to last.

On the ocean, if you can’t keep your ships together, you cut the ties that bind you and sail away from one another. We have all witnessed this sad conclusion to many relationships.

We must guard against such devastating results. Anger and bitterness, secrecy, and selfishness can rip and tear at the chords of fellowship when stress comes.

Dishonesty and betrayal are the axes that sever those chords with nauseating finality. The lashings must be strong and numerous, and they must be nurtured constantly.

Who is your boat tied to? Have you prepared that relationship for the inevitable storms that will surely come?

It’s true; relationships need an effort from both/all parties. But after all, somebody’s got to throw the first rope. 

(SPECIAL NOTE — Thank you for your continued support of the Biblical Recorder site. During this interim period while we are searching for a new Editor/President the comments section will be temporarily discontinued. Thank you for your understanding and patience in this. If you do have comments or issues with items we run, please contact dianna@biblicalrecorder.org or call 919-847-2127.)
3/7/2011 3:52:00 AM by Joel Stephens, pastor, Westfield Baptist Church | with 0 comments



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